2014 - Spring

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UPPER DIVISION COURSES

LOWER DIVISION COURSES

RTF 178 INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA

http://communication.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses

RTF 178 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330L. The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:

  • A weekly journal
  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship
  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

RTF 305 INTRODUCTION MEDIA STUDIES-WB • JOSH GLEICH

Introduction to historical, cultural, political, economic, and international characteristics of film, television, and other media in society. Required of all radio-television-film majors. Also taught as a Web-based course.

RTF 309 COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY TBD

This course examines the context and significance of contemporary information and communication technologies and institutions. It offers an overview of the social, political and policy dimensions of these technologies, surveys their historical development and current uses, and highlights some of the significant social issues and conflicts they raise. Communication and sociological theory are used to make sense of the relationship between communications technology and social use, operation and development. Special attention is paid to dilemmas in contemporary communications policy and practice, such as protection of privacy and personal information, information ownership, free speech, and the role of communication in political processes.

RTF 312C INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL MEDIA • RAI

In recent years, the globalization of media has become a key issue of debate in many nations and cultures around the world. Yet, many discussions about globalization tend to obscure the often complex and contradictory relationships among global, national and local forces. In this course we will critically examine the role that film, television, video games, and other media play in shaping our sense of global, national, and local cultures and identities.

The goal of this course is to introduce you to a broad range of issues that are stimulating research in the field of global media studies. The first part of the course will focus on global media institutions, and the second part on audience uses of global media and issues of cultural identity.

RTF 314 DEVELOPMENT OF MOTION PICTURE • MORGAN O'BRIEN; COLLEEN MONTGOMERY; PAUL GANSKY

This course will seek to build a multicultural history of cinema that surveys critical approaches (institutional, social, political, aesthetic, and technological) and stresses the relationship between films and context. It focuses on mainstream and alternative, North American and International, production and reception, and fictional and nonfiction cinemas in an effort to investigate the many voices and histories of film development.

RTF 316 HISTORY OF US RADIO AND TELEVISION CHARLOTTE HOWELL

This class is a historical survey of US radio and television broadcasting and related electronic media from the early 20th century to the present. We will watch and discuss representative programs and read academic texts, all the while maintaining a critical focus on the interactions between the broadcasting industries and technology, society, culture, politics and aesthetics.

RTF/COM 316M RACE AND ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA • MARY BELTRÁN

This course is designed to provide students with language and critical tools to understand and discuss racial and ethnic representation and production issues in U.S. film and entertainment television. We will survey the history and evolving representations of race and ethnicity in the entertainment media and related topics of concern to audiences, media producers, and scholars, while intersections of class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship will also be explored. Meets the Cultural Diversity flag requirement.

RTF 317 NARRATIVE STRATEGIES • TOM SCHATZ

This class focuses on the study of how meaning is structured and perceived through the aesthetics of audiovisual images. It also surveys the various modes used in narrative and non-narrative storytelling in fiction film and television.

RTF 318 INTRO TO IMAGE AND SOUND • MICAH BARBER

This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project.

RTF 319 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MEDIA BAHAA GHOBRIAL

RTF 319 is an introductory course in the production and distribution of digital media content. The course will familiarize students with the basic tools and concepts necessary to produce content for new media environments. Students will be given the opportunity to produce and distribute a variety of content over the Internet.

The overall goal of the class is (1) to give students the opportunity to work and learn with each other while translating their ideas and creativity into digital media content; and (2) to help students develop an awareness of the social institutions that influence the production and distribution of digital media content. Students will be introduced to software-based techniques and principles for digital image composition, 2D and 3D static and motion graphics creation, audio and video editing and mixing, and principles of interactive media.

The course is divided into lecture (two 1.5 hour sessions per week) and lab (one two-hour session per week). Some lectures are intended to introduce students to various theories and histories of technological development while others are used to develop media production and communication skills. Labs are used to complete homework assignments and to give students a chance to work with their peers on projects.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES

RTF 324L CAREERS IN ENTERTAINMENT-L A

RTF 330L INTRNSHP FILM & ELEC MEDIA-L A

RTF 330L INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA

http://communication.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses

The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, BMC 2.302 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:
- A weekly journal
- Work samples or a portfolio
- Your evaluation of the internship
- Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

FIRST CLASS DAY POLICY: Students must attend the first class day or they will be dropped.

RTF 331P *INTERNET AND POLITICS • JENNIFER BRUNDIDGE

The focus of this course lies at the intersection of Internet use and democratic/political life. Here, we will investigate connections between the Internet, traditional media environments, and various forms of political engagement. What is the impact of an increasingly rich online information environment on political knowledge levels among the public? How do different types of Internet use affect people’s willingness and ability to meaningfully participate in democratic processes? How important is social media in setting the public agenda? With reference to these and many other questions, we will of course have the opportunity to explore the impact of Internet use on the recent 2012 U.S. presidential election campaigns.

*Note: This course is open to non-RTF majors.

RTF 331P INTERNET CULTURES • MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA

The Internet refers to a global network of interconnected computers. While Internet technology opened up new possibilities for communication, it was the development of the World Wide Web and the graphical browser in the nineties that made the Internet a popular and powerful tool for communication. Today, the Web is the most widely used part of the Internet and has dramatically transformed everyday life, culture, politics, business and communities. This course will critically examine the emergence and significance of Internet cultures in our world today. It will introduce you to the technological, financial, cultural and political aspects of the digital information revolution and Internet and Web-based media and communications. The course will deal with topics such as e-commerce, governance and regulation, online communities, homepages, blogs, videogame cultures, virtual realities, cyborg identities, multi-media applications, technological convergence, digital divide and transnational politics. It will interrogate the politics of race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, nationalism, capital, community and technology shaping the practices of contemporary Internet cultures.
 
RTF 331T CREATING MUSIC & SOUND FOR FILM/VIDEO/GAMES • BRIAN SATTERWHITE
 

RTF 331T is a lecture/lab course designed to introduce students to concepts of music and sound for a variety of media with a primary focus on creating original music and/or sound tracks. We will work with Apple Logic Studio Pro and other resources in CMB Studio 4B. There will be no Windows software in this course.

REQUIREMENTS: RTF 331T requires some working knowledge of music - not necessarily formal training, but even playing in a band is helpful. It would also be very helpful to you if you have any experience with music and/or media software. If you do not have any experience in music, and music or media software, we should warn you that the course may prove to take up a lot more time than other courses AND that all this time will have to be spent in Studio 4B, unless you own a Mac running Logic Studio 7. Logic Studio 7 is rather complex. On the other hand, if you have a LOT of music and music/media software experience, we should warn you that you could be bored by the class pace, as many students will be totally new to the world of music software (though not media software). If you already know Logic and have been scoring films and/or games, this class probably will not teach you anything you don't know already.

RTF 333 INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING • TOM WILLETT

RTF 333 will introduce you to screenwriting, and the primary forms which writing for the screen may take: features, shorts, television and documentary. We will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. In lecture and sections, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft.

RTF 336 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN RADIO-TV-FILM

RTF 340 STUDIO PRODUCTION: MULTI-CAMERA • DAN KNIGHT

This class uses the multi-camera studio to produce drama, music, or special events projects from script selection to screen. It provides the opportunity to develop skills such as lighting, sound, cinematography, script analysis, directing cameras and actors, and producing. Students work in teams, each team is responsible for at least one complete production. In addition each student serves in various crew positions for the other productions. This model is used on various program genres. Examples include: Saturday Night Live, Conan O'Brien, concerts, sports, daytime dramas, talk and game shows and sitcoms. The model is also useful for reducing the budget for interior photography on features or prime time dramas shot in HD.

RTF 341 AUDIO PRODUCTION: SOUND FOR PICTURE • TODD THOMPSON

Sound design/Editing to a pre-mix. Course will cover dialogue editing, creating sound elements, Foley, ADR, ambiences, working with music, effects, and preparing for the mix. Students will also be expected to do their own mixes of a student or professional film. These may be the final mix as stereo or may be a pre-mix for a professional mixer in a video non-linear editing system. If you could take only one audio class on your path to filmmaking, this would be the one.

RTF 341C SOUND DESIGN AND MIXING • STEVE DEGENNARO

Sound Design happens before production begins, through production and post. This is the mix class for those who see themselves in a career in audio post or those who just want a thorough understanding of the process. This class is a practical and theoretical exploration of the craft and esthetics of post-production sound with the goal of making you experienced and comfortable mixing in stereo and surround. It will cover editing, Foley and effects, ADR, processing audio, cleaning up sound issues, and experimenting with sound, music, and silence before and in the re-recording—the mix.
PREREQUISITE: Radio-Television-Film 337, 337P, or 341, or permission of the instructor.

RTF 342 GLOBAL TV: ISSUES AND PROBLEMS • SHANTI KUMAR

In recent years, the globalization of media has become a key issue of debate in many nations and cultures around the world. Yet, many discussions about globalization tend to obscure the often complex and contradictory relationships among global, national and local forces. In this course we will critically examine the role that film, television, video games, and other media play in shaping our sense of global, national, and local cultures and identities.

The goal of this course is to introduce you to a broad range of issues that are stimulating research in the field of global media studies. The first part of the course will focus on global media institutions, and the second part on audience uses of global media and issues of cultural identity.

RTF 343 ACTING FOR FILMMAKERS • ANDREW SHEA

This workshop explores the key elements of basic acting technique through active engagement in a variety of exercises and assignments: improvisation, monologue and scene study, observation, and emotional preparation. The goal is to develop a deep understanding of the job of the actor: to live life truthfully under imaginary circumstances.

RTF 343 ADVANCED DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION PAUL STEKLER

This course involves intensive hands-on work in all aspects of documentary video production, in addition to critical investigations of a variety of contemporary non-fiction forms. Much of the semester revolves around producing a documentary (either individually or in a small group) and completing workshop projects, thus offering experience in project development and conceptualization, camerawork, sound recording, lighting and editing.

RTF 343 ADVANCED NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • KAT CANDLER

From script to sound design, students spend the semester completing an advanced video production (3 - 10 minutes). Emphasis is placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Students are not required to direct, but must participate in the key crew positions on various projects for full credit.

 

RTF 343 CINEMA LABORATORY • DEB LEWIS

Limited to 15 participants. In the cinema laboratory, we will make ten short films – some during class and some outside of class – with the emphasis being on making, taking risks and exploring the cinematic form on an elemental level. There will be failures and triumphs—all work strengthening and stretching our ability to express ideas and feelings through picture and sound. Cinema Laboratory’s practice of consistent moviemaking aims to create a space and time where filmmaking efforts are not expensive and precious, but intuitive, brief, engaging, and challenging in a fast-paced workshop setting. Motivated, hard-working, curious and highly creative students are sought to participate.

Throughout the semester-long laboratory, we will sharpen our cinema-making skills through attention to process and experimentation in order to move to a higher level of precision in our work. We will take many exercises from the notebook of Robert Bresson, who wrote, “It is with something clean and precise that you will force the attention of inattentive eyes and ears.” Precision arises through both practice and experimentation.

“The cinema language happened by experimentation—by people not knowing what to do…. I always like to say that cinema without risk is like having no sex and expecting to have a baby… If you don’t take a risk then how are you going to make something really beautiful, that hasn’t been seen before?”—Francis Ford Coppola

Cinema Laboratory seeks self-driven RTF graduate students, upper level RTF undergraduates (especially those in their last semester at UT), Photojournalism students, and students from the School of Architecture and the Art School. There will be a Wednesday evening lab for those from non-RTF departments to learn RTF protocol and basic editing, camera and sound work.

Please contact Deb Lewis with questions regarding the Laboratory: deb.lewis@austin.utexas.edu

 

RTF 343 DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION FOR THE WEB • SCOTT RICE

Students will produce compelling short-form documentaries to be aired on a new online network devoted to mental health awareness. Each web series episode will run 4-8 minutes. Emphasis will be placed on storytelling, character development, production value, and educational value. Film students of any specialty are welcome. Producers, directors, editors, sound recordists and/or designers and cinematographers will all be given their choice of project. Finished docs may be seen by a national audience. This course is cross-listed with psychology and other departments. Students who want to explore mental health issues through cinema are encouraged to enroll. Topics include how individuals or families are impacted by anxiety disorders (panic disorder, OCD, PTSD), mood disorders (depression, bipolar disorder) or psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, psychosis).

Prerequisites: Radio-Television-Film 340 or 366K

RTF 343 YOUR FILM: FUNDING TO FESTIVAL • GEOFF MARSLETT

If a film gets made in film school but nobody sees it, did it really get made?

This is a dilemma that aspiring film students and independent film directors and producers face everyday. Working tirelessly to complete a high quality film is only half the battle. You still need to figure out how, where, and when to present it. This class is designed to help students navigate the difficult, mysterious, and ever-changing process of getting an independent film seen and programmed. This is a process that begins before they shoot their first frame and often goes on for a year or two after they premiere.

In this production course all students will use their own projects (at various stages of production) to complete the various stages of promoting their work from fundraising through presenting the film.

In order to engage your intended audience, it helps to have a general idea who you are making the film for when you start making it. Making realistic goals, assumptions and plans for the film will allow the filmmakers to budget their time and resources appropriately. It will also help them determine how much money they could potentially raise and how to actually raise that money once they are ready to make the film. At this stage of the class we will explore different crowdfunding platforms and techniques to make the campaign successful. We will also cover all the technical aspects of setting one up. Concurrently we will cover many of the grant options available to both students and to independent filmmakers.

In addition to raising money you must build a fanbase. All students will learn how to set up a social media presence using Twitter, Facebook, websites, press coverage, blogs, etc. How big of a presence should my film have? How much will it cost? What can I do on my own? You will need a print campaign once you reach the exhibition stage of your project. Students will also learn what types of print materials they will need for festival runs and how to make these on a budget.

Where is that fanbase? Once you are ready where do you show your film? You need to learn which festivals are showing the type of film you just made. Target the correct festivals so you will get accepted and appreciated once you are there. We will also go over the application process, festival calendar, premiere status, costs, etc.

Finally, you show your film. How do you decide whether to attend or not? We will also focus on choosing which festivals to attend, how many representatives from the film should attend, and how to make the most of your experience once you are there. The festival experience can be both enjoyable and a good platform to launch or further your career.

  • What's crowdfunding?
  • How much money can I raise?
  • Are these tax-deductible donations?
  • Are there grants for making films like this?
  • Should I use Kickstarter or Indiegogo?
  • How do you get into a film festival?
  • Is anybody going to want to see what I just made?
  • How do I get someone in the industry to see my movie?
  • How big is a movie poster supposed to be?
  • Do I need to make business cards?
  • I don't know anyone in the industry, what am I going to do?
  • Are there any good festivals in Texas?
  • How did you get a write up in that magazine?
  • Do I need a twitter account for my film?
  • What should I post on my Facebook page?
  • Who is my fanbase?
  • What's a publicist do for me?
  • What's the cheapest way to host a website for this movie?
  • Does anyone watch short films?
  • What's a sales rep?
  • Is applying to that film festival worth the money?
  • Should I use Vimeo or Youtube?
  • Should I even be showing my film online right now?
  • Where should I premiere this film?
  • Should my actors come to the festival with me?
  • How many days should I spend at the festival?
  • What do I do once I get there?
  • Should I introduce myself to the panel speakers?
  • What do I need to bring with me?
  • How many festivals should I apply to?

 

RTF 343N ADVANCED 3D PRODUCTION • BUZZ HAYS

RTF 343N – Advanced 3D Production, is the primary production course in the UT3D curriculum. Successful completion of the Introduction to 3D course is required, but the course also operates as a consent course, meaning that students must apply, with this form, for admission. The UT3D Program Director will select candidates from the forms submitted, with priority given to forms submitted by October 23rd (registration begins on the 28th). Please note that class space is very limited, but that students who do not gain admission for the Spring 2014 semester will be encouraged to apply again—there is no penalty for a gap in semesters.

RTF 344M COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR FILM AND GAMES • BEN BAYS

This course is a production-based overview of Maya, with a focus on modeling, surfacing, lighting, and particles. Topics include interactive environments and CG compositing and lighting.

RTF 344M INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAME DEVELOPMENT • RHETT BENNATT

The course will examine some of the basic principles of designing and creating a game with an emphasis on game architecture and logical structure of the story. It is intended for RTF students who have little or no background in computer programming and who would like to explore game creation. Topics will include – logical planning of a multi-threaded story, manipulation of objects and characters, interactive game play, screen management and other related technical issues. By the end of the course students will individually or in small teams develop some small games targeted at hand-held devices such as the iPhone.

Prerequisites: For radio-television-film majors, the following coursework with a grade of at least C in each course: Radio-Television-Film 305, 318 or 319, and six additional semester hours of coursework chosen from Radio-Television-Film 309, 314, 316, 317, 318, and 319; for others, upper-division standing and consent of instructor. For this course, students are not expected to have any formal training in programming, game development or game creation. However, skills such as drawing, story creation, sound design, graphic design, etc. will be of value. Meets with FA 360 and TD 354T.

RTF 344M VISUAL EFFECTS & MOTION GRAPHICS • WILEY AKINS; BEN BAYS

This is a production course designed to introduce and expand your knowledge of the world of motion graphics and special effects. Credits, transitions, greenscreen, filters, masks, mattes, all sorts of things. In contrast to the animation course, this class will focus on advanced compositing and techniques to enrich your video, stills, typography and to get exactly what you want to see onscreen. You will not be required to draw anything (complicated). Consider this more of a course in design than art. We will take the elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, direction, size, perspective and space and add one more thing to them: time.

RTF 344M WRITING/NARRATIVE DESIGN FOR VIDEO GAMES • PACOTTI

Video games and other interactive media increasingly require well-crafted storylines and strong characters. This workshop is designed to give aspiring game writers the skills, knowledge and techniques needed to write successfully for the games industry. Through the creation of original interactive games, students will focus on such fundamentals as premise, character development, story structure, and the creation of multi-level worlds.

RTF 344N GAME DEVELOPMENT CAPSTONE: 3D GAMES* • PAUL TOPRAC

The Capstone Game Development course brings together students from Computer Science, College of Fine Arts, and Radio-TV-Film to form small teams in which each student will contribute specialized knowledge to the group creation of 3D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 3D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios.
*If interested, please read instructions to apply.

RTF 344N 3D CHARACTER ANIMATION • WILEY AKINS

This is a production course designed to introduce you to the fundamental principles of character animation within the context of using Maya specifically. The course will cover some of the variety of tools used in Maya to create object movement and animation and how to use those tools to follow the basic conventions of animation.

RTF 344N UNDERGRADUATE ANIMATION THESIS • GEOFF MARSLETT

 

This class is designed for students who have already refined their animation skills and want to apply them toward making an entire animated short film. Each student will write and produce a 2-10 minute animated film for the class. They will be expected to write the script, develop the visual style, create animatics, character sheets, budgets and schedules, record audio, animate, and finish one single film. They will also be expected to support their classmates through discussions and work in progress screenings throughout the semester. All animation styles and techniques are welcome. Since this is a chance for advanced undergraduate students to make an animated project that shows off their potential, I expect everyone enrolled to have taken at least one of* the other animation courses we offer (see list below)* and to be comfortable with the basic techniques they wish to use. If you are interested in creating an animated short film for festivals or for your reel, this is the class for you!

PREREQ​​UISITES
*NOTE: This is different than the pre-req listed in the course schedule. This is what’s actually required.
You are required to have completed one of the following animation courses:

  • Intro to 2-D Animation
  • Advanced 2-D Animation
  • CG for Film and Games
  • Character Animation in 3D
  • Visual Effects and Motion Graphics
  • Advanced Visual Effects and Motion Graphics
  • Capstone Game Development (if used animation)

 

RTF 345 AMERICAN CINEMA OF THE 1930s • CAROLINE FRICK

Seen by many film historians and critics as the "Golden Age of Hollywood," 1930s cinema culture provides an excellent prism through which to discuss and analyze socio-cultural issues and the role of the American film industries to them. In this course, students will engage both with "classic" films produced by the major Hollywood studios as well as with the media created in an alternative economic context (e.g., government sponsored cinema, educational or training material, and itinerant filmmaking.) The class will combine screenings, lectures and readings to focus on a uniquely complex time in American film history.

RTF 345 SOCIAL DOCUMENTARY • KAREN KOCHER

RTF 346 INTRODUCTION TO EDITING • KAREN KOCHER; ANNE LEWIS; CATHERINE LICATA

Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

RTF 346E INTERMEDIATE EDITING • ANNE LEWIS; CHRIS ROLDAN

This course is a further elaboration of the principles and techniques of editing students will have encountered in RTF 346, building a broader technical background for professional development. We will discuss aesthetic, technical, and practical approaches to editing and consider how they might best apply to some (provided) editing challenges. In particular, we'll concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a range of material and creative solutions to editing challenges. Taught using AVID software.

RTF 347C BROADCAST AND CABLE MANAGEMENT • STEVE JENNINGS

This course is designed specifically to give an in-depth look at what is necessary to operate a broadcast station organization. The course will offer first hand information from the leading News Directors, Promotion Directors, Programming Directors, General Sales Managers, Production and Operation Mangers, and Chief Engineers in local television and radio companies. More specifically, the course will address the following:

  • What does managing a leading news department entail?
  • How do you promote your station?
  • How does the revenue side of the business work?
  • How do you attain syndicated programming for your station?
  • What is involved in the negotiations for these programs?
  • What does high definition television mean for broadcasters in the future?

Students will have the opportunity to interact with guest lecturers and hear how day-to-day operations work as well as learn about the unique challenges facing broadcasters in the future.

RTF 351C INTRODUCTION TO 2-D ANIMATION • GEOFF MARSLETT

This course will introduce the student to the art and mechanics of two-dimensional animation in film and in digital media. Weekly exercises will be required, with an emphasis on animation as personal expression.

RTF 351D 2D ANIMATION AND MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS

Students will use the basic 2D animation skills learned in the 351C Digital Animation and Graphics class to focus on the production of longer animated projects. Additional techniques including some motion graphics, stop motion, and advanced 2D will also be covered in class.

RTF 359 LATINO IMAGES IN FILM • CHARLES RAMÍREZ BERG

This class will investigate stereotyping in the American media by looking at how Hollywood films have portrayed Hispanics. The focus will be on Mexicans and Mexican-Americans, but Hollywood treatment of other Hispanic groups will also be discussed, and the concepts we cover are applicable to other stereotyped groups. The course will answer the following questions: 1) What is the history of Latino representation in Hollywood movies and TV? 2) What Latino stereotypes have developed? 3) What are the key sociological, psychological, and ideological theories about stereotyping? 4) Why have Latinos been represented in these ways? 5) What does such representation signify about America, its movies, and its minorities? 6) How have Latino filmmakers responded to stereotyping by representing themselves in media?

RTF 359 YOUTH AND SOCIAL MEDIA • CRAIG WATKINS

The rise of social media is one of the defining aspects of life in today's digital age. In this class we will consider a range of issues related to young people's use of social media. We begin by exploring the questions: what is social media and how does it differ from more traditional media platforms like television and print? In addition, the class will examine how expressions of human social behavior are evolving with the increasing use of social media. Are we more or less social today? The bulk of the work for the class will be hands on field experiments related to platforms like Facebook and Twitter. For example, students will conduct creative fieldwork that explores various activities in Facebook. More precisely, how are we using social media to navigate our news, entertainment, and information environment? How has the use of Twitter evolved and what do those shifts reveal about young people's engagement with social media. We will use a number of studies regarding social networks, media use, and the internet to inform our approach and analysis of social media. In addition to collecting original data students are expected to produce written reports and presentations based on their fieldwork.

RTF 359S GIRLS' MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES • MORGAN BLUE

This course introduces students to the critical analysis of women and media culture. Focusing primarily on commercial media texts mass produced in the United States, we will explore the dominant strategies used by the magazine, film, and broadcasting industries to represent women and women's issues, as well as to attract women consumers. In addition, we will examine how women participate in media culture via their roles as consumers and audiences, as well as fans of particular cultural texts. Although we will primarily examine media texts produced and distributed by the commercial media and entertainment industries, we will also explore how women have developed alternative media economies by creating their own cultural texts and practices.

RTF 359S MEDIA ARCHAEOLOGY • CAROLINE FRICK

Romantic images of the archaeologist have been a component of cinema for over a hundred years. But what if Indiana Jones needed to search for old media – magic lantern slides or nitrate celluloid – instead of golden treasure? This course will cast students as historical explorers, focusing our quest to discover and better understand media as artifacts rather than just as narratives or “texts.” How can understanding radio, television, film and online video as physical objects that decompose (and even explode) over time complicate our understanding of the past? This class will focus upon the materiality of media within specific socio-cultural, economic and technological time periods, each with their own modes of historic, and futuristic, discourse. Topics will include studio preservation policy and national cinemas, the role of the archive and museum, high profile film restorations and even Martin Scorsese.

RTF 365 MAPPING LATINO CULTURE IN EAST AUSTIN • JOE STRAUBHAAR

RTF 365 MEDIA LAW AND POLICY • SHARON STROVER

This course engages some of the contemporary ethical and policy issues facing media industries and the American public. Rooted in an understanding of the First Amendment as well as the development of communication industries, the course will examine a range of topics that new media and the Internet have made more complicated. Some of them are:

  • What is the public interest in the 21st century with respect to media?
  • How do technologies such as Facebook, Twitter, and services such as Google influence the standard values associated with older communication forms? Where do the opportunities that they present – such as to help mobilize political movements – fit into our understanding of law and our social values?
  • With Facebook information pervasive and surveillance technologies deployed throughout society, where do privacy rights and responsibilities stand?
  • How does media ownership bear on the sorts of content that we can access and use?
  • How should the international Internet be managed?
  • Are contemporary censorship and decency standards “working”? Why do we need them – or do we?
  • Why is the government involved in regulating media industries?
  • Should the NSA be allowed to monitor all of our communications?
  • How do the economics of various communications systems influence law and policy?

The course will be structured in terms of modules on different ethical issues or dilemmas, and you will write several “position papers” and/or White Papers on certain topics. This course will enable you to understand both how our policy and legal systems operate as well as where the pressure points are located in our public culture.

RTF 365 NEW MEDIA LITERACY • KATHLEEN TYNER

Media literacy is the ability to strategically access, analyze, evaluate, and produce communication in a variety of forms. This course explores the expanding nature of literacy in a digital world. Through the use of new media tools and an awareness of the historical uses of literacy, students will explore concepts of multiliteracies and the way they have changed society over time. Relationships between alphabetic, electronic, social and digital media will be explored through crosscutting techniques that can also be used to analyze the content and contexts of a wide variety of media. Students will use promising practices and new tools in the field to expand their existing media literacy skills and to design innovative presentations and projects that take advantage of new media.

RTF 366D DIRECTING WORKSHOP • ANDREW SHEA; ANDREW BUJALSKI

This workshop explores the role of the director in the process of translation from page to screen, focusing on the director/actor relationship, narrative structure and visual language. Assignments will include the casting, mounting and realization of dramatic narrative scenes. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the skills necessary to communicate effectively with actors to achieve authentic and vivid performances.

RTF 366K EAST AUSTIN STORIES DOCUMENTARY PROJECT • ANDREW GARRISON

The East Austin Stories documentary class is an intensive hands-on course in small format documentary video production. Student will produce two finished documentaries, one of which will be screened before audiences in East Austin in at least two locations, as well as streamed on the website.

RTF 366K EXPERIMENTAL FILM PRODUCTION • ELLEN SPIRO

This course encourages students to break the boundaries of conventional film and video making by using inventive formal approaches, interventionist techniques and challenging content, as well as new and emerging forms of digital media. While the primary focus in student production will be using non-fiction content in innovative ways, students may combine genres and create hybrid forms, as well as using web-based platforms for interactive and digital media creation. Students will develop their own creative voice and point of view and are highly encouraged to produce work that defies standard genres and conventions.

Students will be encouraged to capture material through a variety of means (such as smartphones, cheap digital cameras and security cameras) and try different ways to process and edit it. We will also be discussing production topics such as working with video in multiple channels, alternative materials for projections, basic animation techniques, and connections between image and sound.

Works screened in class will include groundbreaking avant garde film, sound and video from the 1930’s to the present, including artists such as Stan Brackage, Shirley Clarke, Jonas Mekas, Maya Deren, John Cage, George Kuchar, Andy Warhol, Tony Oursler, Nam June Paik, Steina and Woody Vasulka, Sadie Benning, Shirin Neshat, Bruce Nauman, Ant Farm, Joan Jonas, Laurie Anderson and Bill Viola. Screenings of experimental works will be tailored to reflect the specific interests of students as projects develop.

Readings discussed in class will create a context for the production of experimental work, providing an overview of the history of video art and avant garde filmmaking. Readings will also explore a range of cultural, formal, political, and historical issues emerging from video art practice, experimental film and audio art forms.

This is a production intensive class. Students will produce short works every week during the semester, as well as a longer final project

RTF 366K INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION • ELLEN SPIRO

This class introduces students to single-camera field documentary video production. Basic instruction will be provided on digital cameras and digital off-line editing. Individual exercises and group projects will be assigned throughout the semester.

RTF 366K NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • AMY BENCH; PJ RAVAL; STEVE MIMS

The class explores the expressive potential of sound and image through the production of digital video and 16mm exercises and short films. It is an intensive workshop in visual storytelling and non-dialogue filmmaking. It is designed to build upon the fundamental production concepts and techniques that were introduced in RTF 318 and to prepare students for the advanced narrative classes.

RTF 366M INTRO TO 3-D PRODUCTION • BUZZ HAYS

RTF 366M - Intro to 3D Production is the gateway course into the UT3D curriculum. It has the same pre-requisites that 366K courses have, but operates as a consent course, meaning that students must also apply, by following the application instructions below, for admission. The UT3D Program Director will select candidates from the forms submitted, with priority given to applications submitted by October 21st (registration begins on the 28th). Please note that the goal is to ensure a cohort of students who can support and encourage each other in their efforts through the program, and that a wide range of production interests and backgrounds will be sought. To apply:

  1. Download and fill out the application.
  2. Using the subject line: "UT3D - Application for RTF 366M", email the application as an attachment to rtf-submissions@austin.utexas.edu
  3. Priority deadline is October 21.

RTF 367K PRODUCING FOR FILM AND TELEVISION • RICHARD LEWIS

RTF 367K will detail how things work in the supposedly noncreative side of the entertainment industry. The course will focus on the function and duties of a producer as he or she shepherds an idea through a project "life cycle": development, financing, pre-production, post-production, marketing and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers.

RTF 367P ADVANCED PRODUCING • MICAH BARBER

Advanced Producing is a business oriented, hands-on, extremely practical, intimate class of only twenty students learning the parts of filmmaking that aren't writing, shooting, or directing. The very first class in Spring 05 set the bar very high for those that have followed by taking on a superb low-budget, digital film called CAVITE during its post-production as it prepared for SXSW. Over the next 18 months (and three more classes) it reaped critical acclaim, stormed the festival circuit, got a distribution deal, won the Someone To Watch Spirit Award, and shipped tens of thousands of DVDs. The Advanced Producing students received much recognition along the way as they learned the ropes. But that was just the start. Subsequent classes have pitched in on key post-production decisions then handled promotion, publicity and distribution sales for a series of other SXSW films including the documentaries JAM (2006), THROW DOWN YOUR HEART and OF ALL THE THINGS (both 2008). In 2007 the class garnered national coverage in the NY Times and LA Times for its involvement with a film that critically appraised Michael Moore called MANUFACTURING DISSENT, an international success story.

RTF 368S MEDIA STUDIES THESIS

RTF 368S UNDERGRADUATE PRODUCTION THESIS • RICHARD LEWIS

For filmmakers wishing to create a narrative or documentary film that demonstrates and showcases advanced filmmaking skills.

The class is for DIRECTORS and PRODUCERS (exceptions to this rule noted below), and students should apply in two person directing/producing teams that will work together to shepherd the project from beginning to end. From pre-production to sound mix, students will complete a short film or video project (under 12 minutes in length) with the most advanced equipment available to RTF undergraduates. Emphasis will be placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Teams must enter the class with detailed outlines or scripts, and the directing/producing teams are responsible for assembling their own crews.
 

For information on how to apply, see http://rtf.utexas.edu/undergraduate/courses/thesis#Production

RTF 368S UNDERGRADUATE SCREENWRITING THESIS • STUART KELBAN

For dedicated screenwriters seeking a culmination of their screenwriting studies at RTF. Students will write either a feature screenplay (in any genre) or an original TV pilot (30 or 60 minute, network or cable). The course will take students through the entire development process – from loglines, through outlining, to finished first draft. The goal is for students to leave with a polished piece of writing that showcases their advanced screenwriting talents, suitable for competitions, grad school applications, or as calling cards into the professional world.

For information on how to apply, see http://rtf.utexas.edu/undergraduate/courses/thesis#Screenwriting

RTF 369 ADVANCED SCREENWRITNG FOR FEATURE FILM • BEAU THORNE; TOM WILLETT

In this class, students will complete a feature-length screenplay (90-120 pages) by the end of the semester. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.

RTF 369 ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: FEATURES (INDIES) • BRYAN POYSER

This workshop class is focused on writing screenplays designed for micro-budget, independent production. As students write their own feature-length scripts (90-120 pages) throughout the semester, they will study and analyze completed micro-budget films and their production methods. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.

RTF 369 ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV PILOTS • BEAU THORNE

Each student will create a brand new television show (30 or 60 minute, network or cable) from the ground up: researching the setting and historical moment, inventing the characters and relationships, and ultimately designing the conflicts necessary to propel a show through multiple seasons. Students will then distill all of this work into a single showpiece episode - a pilot - that demonstrates the artistic and commercial potential of the new show. We’ll also be looking at a range of produced pilots (both aired and unaired) and discussing what makes the best of them work.

RTF 369 ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV SPECS • CINDY MCCREERY

Over the course of the semester, students will be writing a TV "Spec" script of an existing current half hour and hour-long show. Students will take an in-depth look at TV writing from the inside out where they will learn how to "break" an episode of show and also learn how a TV writer's room works.

RTF 370 COMEDY IN FILM AND MEDIA • KATHY FULLER-SEELEY

This course explores theories of humor and comedy and applies them to media and performance from the early 20th century US to the present. Readings draw broadly from philosophy, cultural studies, cinema and TV studies, race, gender, sexuality, politics, psychology. We will examine producers, texts, performers and audiences across a wide variety of media -- television and film, literature, comics, radio, internet, live performance and other forms. The seminar will be focused on student group discussion and presentation of theories, texts, specific examples of applications, and findings. Students will develop research/and/or create projects.

RTF 378H HONORS TUTORIAL COURSE

SENIOR FELLOWS • KARIN WILKINS