2016 - Summer

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

Summer courses are offered in three terms. The letter preceding the course number describes the course dates:

f first term 2 Jun - 7 Jul
s second term 11 Jul - 12 Aug
n nine-week term 2 Jun - 26 Jul

NINE-WEEK TERM

RTF n369        ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: FILM & TV PILOTS • STUART KELBAN, RICHARD LEWIS
Students will have the opportunity to write either a feature-length film or original television pilot. Feature scripts may be in any genre. TV pilots can be either 30 or 60 minute, for network, cable or streaming outlets. In addition, students will read and comment on their classmates’ work on a weekly basis.

WHOLE SESSION

RTF w330L     INTERNSHIPS IN ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421. At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:

  • A weekly journal
  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship
  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

RTF w347C 1-HOW HOLLYWOOD WORKS-LA • PHIL NEMY
Tracking the life cycle of motion pictures and television shows from inception of the original ideas all the way through marketing and distribution, this course is designed to explore business topics in the entertainment industry. Through case studies, readings, and guest speakers representing all facets of show business, students will gain a deeper understanding of the business side of the entertainment industry, the commercial challenges facing producers and network and studio executives, and the continual struggle between creativity and the bottom line.

RTF w48 INSIDE THE MUSIC INDUSTRY-LA • DREW FERRANTE
Tracking the life cycle of music from inception of the original idea all the way through recording, mixing, marketing and distribution. This course is designed to explore business topics in the music industry. Through case studies, readings, and guest speakers representing all facets of the music business, students will gain a deeper understanding of the business side of the music industry. They will learn the commercial challenges facing record producers and music company executives, and the continual struggle between creativity and the bottom line. In addition, they will learn the many career paths in music as well as the skills, education and experience necessary to start, develop, and grow a career in the exciting world of the music industry.

RTF w348 WORKING HOLLYWOOD WRITER: CRAFTING STORIES FOR THE SCREEN FOR FUN & PROFIT - LA • BRIAN DAVIDSON
It all starts with a Story. Which means—don’t tell the Director or Actors this—it all starts with the Screenwriter. So even if you’ve come to Hollywood to be a Director, Actor, Producer, an Editor, or a Development Executive, Agent/Manager, Cinematographer, even Designer…we all need to understand how a Story is conceived, designed, and executed to wield this ancient art to successfully play our part.

The class will push beyond the traditional understanding of writing (usually from a critical or outside-in approach) and come at it from the inside-out…from the perspective of how a Writer approaches—how a Writer must—approach storytelling. Successful Storytellers are emotional manipulators, just as much con(wo)men as artists. The secret to crafting a successful screen story is less about what it is and more about how you tell it…

So whether you’ve written several scripts or never typed “Fade Out,” this class will give you the tools and tricks to design and create a screen story, as well as, analyze and critique any script you read. Though focused on story creation, we’ll never forget we ply our trade within a commercial framework—whether we label it “Independent” or “Hollywood”—so we’ll always be exploring the business context of professional storytelling in this ever-shifting distribution landscape. Along the way, a few guests will be on hand to speak to different roles and perspectives of professional storytelling for any format.

More practical than theoretical, we will certainly explore the philosophy/psychology foundations behind these tools…but the best way to truly understand the ancient art of storytelling is to develop and write your own screen-story. The ultimate assignment will be individually crafted to the career goals and experience of the individual student (determined with the instructor, of course)…though you will not be expected to complete an entire draft, the goal is to give you the opportunity to begin developing your storytelling skills by structuring and scripting a significant part of a screen-story. Because the ultimate end of this class is to help you write your story for your career...and life.

RTF w348 DEVELOPMENT PROCESS OF FILM/TV-LA  • DIANE KEREW-SHAW
This course is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the development process in both film and television. Through lectures and discussion with guest speakers, students will gain experience in preparing pitches, coverage, and development notes as they learn to identify strengths and weaknesses of literary material typical of that submitted to studios, networks, and production companies. Topics will include story logic; story structure; character development; dramatic tone; the adaptability of other source material into scripts; and the extensive life cycle by which literary material makes it from page to screen. Further emphasis will be given to generating ideas and concepts; networking and tracking; agent contacts; working for a producer vs. working for a studio; the creative executive position; readers, studio and network story departments, and the script coverage process.

RTF w348 NEW MEDIA/EMERGING ENTERTAINMENT-LA • TBA
What is new media? From a technical point of view, it’s the emergence of digital computerized or networked information and communication technologies. From an entertainment point of view, digital interactivity provides creative networks for young and old alike, in challenging, thought-provoking and entertaining gaming environments. This course will explore the burgeoning areas of digital entertainment including broadband, video-on-demand, interactive television, mobile entertainment, and interactive digital gaming.

FIRST SESSION

RTF f301N      SOCIAL ACTIVISIM IN FILM • ANNE LEWIS
Do you feel passionate about immigration, the environment, economic inequality, guns on campus, LGBTQ rights...?  This new summer class explores ways filmmakers express ideas and vision—from propaganda to humor. Guest speakers include grassroots leaders and communicators.  You will brainstorm ideas, interview, cover events, and edit using commonly available equipment and free software. Open to all (including non majors), without pre-requisite.

RTF f305         INTRO TO MEDIA STUDIES - WB • SWAPNIL RAI
This course, which is conducted entirely online, focuses on the study of mass media. It surveys the cultural industries from multiple perspectives, including history, economics, regulation and social effects. It emphasizes the relationships among mass media, culture, and power.

RTF f308         DEVELOPMENT OF FILM AND MEDIA • LESLEY WILLARD
This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF f318          INTRO TO IMAGE AND SOUND • MICAH BARBER
This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences.  Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project.

RTF f344M       VISUAL EFFECTS AND MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS
This is a production course designed to introduce and expand your knowledge of the world of motion graphics and special effects. Credits, transitions, greenscreen, filters, masks, mattes, all sorts of things. In contrast to the animation course, this class will focus on advanced compositing and techniques to enrich your video, stills, typography and to get exactly what you want to see onscreen. You will not be required to draw anything (complicated). Consider this more of a course in design than art. We will take the elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, direction, size, perspective and space and add one more thing to them: time.

RTF f346          INTRO TO EDITING • KAREN KOCHER
Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

SECOND SESSION

RTF s301N         DECONSTRUCTING DISNEY'S WORLDS • COLLEEN MONTGOMERY
From its roots as a small, family-run advertising firm in the 1920s, The Walt Disney Company has grown into one of the largest media conglomerates of the 21st century. As a multi-national corporation whose products are consumed by hundreds of millions of people around the world each year, Disney is a major force in contemporary popular culture and one that has played an important role in shaping the development of the current media landscape. For many of us, Disney also has a personal resonance: the company’s films are often some of the first media products we consume as children and all of us are likely to have some engagement with a Disney product over the course of our lives. This course provides the opportunity to reconsider this corporate entity and its familiar products from a more engaged, critical perspective. This does not mean that you must abandon enjoyment of Disney products; rather the goal of this course is to teach you to think critically about Disney and its many “worlds” in order to better understand the larger media culture and industry of which it is a part.

We will examine how The Walt Disney Company and its subsidiaries produce, distribute, market, and monetize a vast array of products across multiple media platforms: from animated and live-action feature film to television, theme parks, video games, and toys. Moving chronologically from the 1920s to the present, we will study Disney’s aesthetic and business models, its approaches to narrative construction and representation, the ideologies of its texts, and its cultural resonance across different historical/national contexts. The course is divided into four units, each structured around a particular analytical approach to media studies, allowing us to examine Disney through a variety of critical lenses, including historiography, political economy/industry studies, feminist, queer and critical race studies, and audience reception theory. The course is therefore also designed to introduce you to multiple media studies approaches/methods.

RTF s301N         SUPERHERO GENRE/CONTEMPORARY HOLLYWOOD • LAURA FELSCHOW
Discover why superheroes currently rule the screen, big and small. As Hollywood studios have become parts of larger global media empires, the superhero genre has expanded beyond comic books and films to include television programs, video games, theatrical productions and more. This course will situate the superhero genre alongside significant changes in the entertainment landscape over the past thirty years due to media conglomeration, technological convergence, and corporate synergy.  Why do superhero characters make such ideal source material for high concept marketing, blockbuster franchising, transmedia storytelling, and the use of spectacular digital effects? How do issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality factor in the development, production, and marketing of superhero properties in contemporary Hollywood? We will explore these questions as we analyze both successful superhero blockbusters and colossal box office failures. Additionally, we will look at television programs, comic books, video games, smart phone apps, and other media platforms as you explore the practices of transmedia franchising often associated with the genre. This class will include a screening, but you will have the option of viewing most of the materials on your own time.

RTF s317            NARRATIVE STRATEGIES AND MEDIA DESIGN • PETER KUNZE
This class focuses on the study of how meaning is structured and perceived through the aesthetics of audiovisual images. It also surveys the various modes used in narrative and non-narrative storytelling in fiction film and television.