2017 - Summer

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

Summer courses are offered in three terms. The letter preceding the course number describes the course dates:

f first term June 1 - July 6
s second term July 10 - August 11
n nine-week term June 1 - July 25
w whole session June 1 - August 11

NINE-WEEK TERM

RTF n301N INTRO TO SCREENWRITING • STUART KELBAN
This course will introduce you to writing for film and television, delving into the three primary elements of screenwriting:  story, character and structure.   In lecture, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts in workshop. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft. Open to non-majors.

WHOLE SESSION

RTF 330L INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:


  • A weekly journal

  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship

  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

To register: http://moody.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses

FIRST SESSION

RTF f301N SCREENING BLACKNESS IN AMERICAN FILM AND TELEVISION • JACKIE PINKOWITZ
Because the history of American race relations has long been governed by the simplistic binary of black and white, the constructions of blackness in popular media carry significant implications for how race – both blackness and whiteness -- and identity more generally are understood in national culture and society.  How have different popular media -- at different industrial, historical, and cultural moments -- variously constructed this racial category, and thus made blackness both visible and meaningful for American audiences?  In addressing this question, this course will critically examine the representation and production of blackness in commercial American film and television, from the emergence of cinema on the eve of the 19th Century through classical Hollywood to the digital, post-network, conglomerate present. Through surveying American film and television history, we will track key movements, texts, and figures in the history of mediated blackness.  We will explore such topics as stereotyping and the politics of representation; independent and/versus mainstream black media producers and productions; feminist critiques and intersectional identities; and black audiences, among others.  In screening and discussing texts like The Birth of a Nation (1915), Imitation of Life (1934), The Cosby Show (1984-1992), Do the Right Thing (1989), Atlanta (2016-), and Moonlight (2016), among many others, this course will prepare students to critically analyze race and the media.  It will introduce them to key concepts and methodologies from media studies, critical race and feminist theories, and cultural studies, and teach them to apply them through lectures, discussion, and weekly screenings; quizzes and a final exam; written screening responses; and a group project. Open to non-majors.

RTF f305 INTRO TO MEDIA STUDIES - WEB BASED • CLAIRE LEE
Introduction to historical, cultural, political, economic, and international characteristics of film, television, and other media in society. Open to non-majors.

RTF f318 INTRO TO IMAGE AND SOUND • MICAH BARBER
This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project. Open to non-majors.

RTF f344M INTRO TO VISUAL EFFECTS AND MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS
This is a production course designed to introduce and expand your knowledge of the world of motion graphics and special effects. Credits, transitions, greenscreen, filters, masks, mattes, all sorts of things. In contrast to the animation course, this class will focus on advanced compositing and techniques to enrich your video, stills, typography and to get exactly what you want to see onscreen. You will not be required to draw anything (complicated). Consider this more of a course in design than art. We will take the elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, direction, size, perspective and space and add one more thing to them: time.

RTF f346 INTRO TO EDITING • ANNE LEWIS
Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

RTF f359 TRANS LIVES: FILM & TV • SUSAN SOMERS-WILLETT
The recent popularity of representing trans lives in media has brought both visibility to non-binary gender experiences and critiques of these representations, especially as they converge with issues of race and sexuality. Using a cultural studies approach, we will explore controversies surrounding the representation of trans people in documentary film, in narrative cinema, and on television while learning to write about these media from non-binary and intersectional perspectives. We will discuss and interpret foundational concepts of feminist and queer film criticism, moving fluidly between examples of classical Hollywood heteronormativity (such as in Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie and Vertigo), New Queer Cinema (such as Paris is Burning, The Crying Game, and Boys Don’t Cry), and more contemporary film and television (such as TransamericaTransparent, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Free CeCe, and Orange is the New Black) that complicate our view of transgender experiences and representations. Special attention will be paid to narratives of and about trans people of color, the performativity of race and gender identity, and drag as a cultural practice. Students will complete two papers and keep a regular viewing journal as part of the course.

Because students will be required to view some material outside of class, a subscription to Netflix and Amazon Prime Video is expected for most of the course (these can be acquired for a free 30-day trial period).

SECOND SESSION

RTF s301N DISNEY: FROM MICKEY TO MARVEL • PETE KUNZE
From an independent production company struggling to survive to a highly profitable global conglomerate, the history of the Walt Disney Company echoes the history of the U.S. media industries. Disney offers generative insights into children’s culture as well as into corporate behaviors and logics that govern media production. In this course, we will consider the role of industry in textual analysis as well as the value of texts for understanding industry. We also will hone our knowledge of the cultural studies framework through close attention to race, gender, sexuality, and class both on screen and behind the scenes at Disney. Through in-depth formalist and ideological analyses of representative Disney narratives, students will better understand Disney and American media in general, both on screen and behind the scenes. Open to non-majors.

RTF s317 NARRATIVE STRATEGIES AND MEDIA DESIGN • NICK BESTOR
This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames. Open to non-majors.

RTF s344M DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION - WEB BASED • BEN BAYS
Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? Open to non-majors.