2019 - Summer

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

Summer courses are offered in three terms. The letter preceding the course number describes the course dates:

f first term June 6 - July 11
s second term July 15 - August 16
n nine-week term June 7 - July 30
w whole session June 7 - August 16

UTLA - WOFFORD DENIUS UTLA CENTER FOR ENTERTAINMENT & MEDIA STUDIES (listed on separate site)

WHOLE SESSION

RTF w330L INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:


  • A weekly journal

  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship

  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

To register: http://moody.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses

RTF 303C         INTRO TO MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRIES – WEB-BASED • TBA

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a social science understanding of media industries and entrepreneurship. We start with a survey of key social science theories and concepts the media landscape. We examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile media and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media organizations and professionals. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. It is designed to help students achieve the following goals upon successful course completion:

  • Understand key social science theories, concepts and methods on the complicated interaction between media and society.
  • Recognize various opportunities, challenges, and responses media industries have to address due to globalization and technological advancements.
  • Understand government policies and industry practices that affect the formation and function of media organizations.
  • Understand the trajectory and development of various legacy and new media industry sectors.
  • Evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, challenges, and process in the media industries facilitated and constrained by institution and culture.

RTF w306 INTRO WORLD CINEMA HISTORY - WEB BASED • TBA
Love the movies? Join us and explore how the movies developed from a circus amusement to multinational industry as well as how film can be understood as socio-cultural , technological, aesthetic and economic artifact. Global in scope, this course will sample a variety of “national cinemas” in order to compare and contrast how moviemaking developed uniquely in different parts of the world. We will also address how decades of popular and critical attention to the glamour and gossip surrounding Hollywood movies has affected our understanding of “American” cinema. The course fulfills VAPA requirements, and is designed for non-RTF majors who have not taken previous coursework in film or media studies. Both an in-person and web-based version of this course are being offered in Spring 2018.  Open only to non-RTF majors.

RTF w329C DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION - WEB BASED • BEN BAYS
Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? Open to both RTF majors and non-majors. Any student with at least 45 hours of coursework will be able to enroll (despite listed prerequisites).

See course promo video.

FIRST SESSION

RTF f301N BLACKNESS IN POPULAR CULTURE • BRIANA BARNER

This course seeks to explore the representation, production and contestation of Blackness within popular culture. Starting primarily from the end of the 20th century and moving into the 21st century, the course will examine Blackness through the lens of various sectors of popular culture, including film, television, radio, podcasting and more. The central question of this course is: How is Blackness predominantly constructed within mainstream US media and popular culture? The course is divided into three segments: foundations of Blackness, intersectional Blackness and digital Blackness. By the end of the course, students will be able to grapple with how the representation of Blackness has shifted and what this means for various audiences. This course does include screenings, such as Chappelle’s Show, Lemonade, and Black Panther. Weekly topics include the politics of representation, Black feminism and Black podcasting. Assignments for this course include weekly discussion posts, short answer essays, and two creative digital assignments, which include the creation of a mixtape and a digital site for a chosen piece of Black media. Open only to non-RTF majors.

RTF f301N VIDEO EDITING FOR NON-MAJORS • ANNE LEWIS

Do you bore and confuse your professors, classmates, family and friends with videos that are long and incoherent? Are you interested in the art that helps raw material express ideas and perceptions? Would you like to play with images and sounds to create something meaningful and beautiful or perhaps funny this summer?
The class includes editing theory, short examples, labs, and demonstrations. You will edit an event, an interview, a fiction scene, a mash-up, and a self-determined final project. We will use Adobe Premiere Pro software – professional and available across campus. Open only to non-RTF majors.

RTF f318 INTRO TO IMAGE AND SOUND • MICAH BARBER
This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project. Open to both RTF majors and non-majors.

RTF f328C GENDER AND MEDIA CULTURE • JENNIFER McCLEAREN
This course provides an introduction to the critical and theoretical analysis of gender (femininities and masculinities) in media (film, television, new and emerging media). Students will engage dominant and oppositional practices of media production, representation, and reception to investigate the sociocultural mechanisms that shape individual and collective notions of gender in our media-saturated environment. Paying particular attention to wider questions of power, politics, and identity, students will read key texts in cultural, media, and communication studies, as well as influential theories within gender, feminist, and transgender studies. Although primarily focused on the mediated construction of gender, this course insists on an intersectional approach that examines gender in conjunction with race, class, sexuality, nation, and generation. Open to both RTF majors and non-majors.

RTF f346 INTRO TO EDITING • KAREN KOCHER
Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.  Open only to RTF majors.

SECOND SESSION

RTF s317 NARRATIVE STRATEGIES AND MEDIA DESIGN • TBA
This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames . Open to both RTF majors and non-majors.

RTF s344M INTRO TO VISUAL EFFECTS AND MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS
This is a production course designed to introduce and expand your knowledge of the world of motion graphics and special effects. Credits, transitions, greenscreen, filters, masks, mattes, all sorts of things. In contrast to the animation course, this class will focus on advanced compositing and techniques to enrich your video, stills, typography and to get exactly what you want to see onscreen. You will not be required to draw anything (complicated). Consider this more of a course in design than art. We will take the elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, direction, size, perspective and space and add one more thing to them: time. Open only to RTF majors.