2016 - Fall

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

PREREQUISITE WAIVER FORM
INTERNSHIPS
NON MAJOR COURSES
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

UTLA - SEMESTER IN LOS ANGELES PROGRAM

INTERNSHIPS

RTF 330L         INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:
- A weekly journal
- Work samples or a portfolio
- Your evaluation of the internship
- Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

FIRST CLASS DAY POLICY: Students must attend the first class day or they will be dropped. To register: http://moody.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses

RTF 178             RADIO-TV-FILM INTERNSHIP
RTF 178 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330L. The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their owfn internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:

  • A weekly journal
  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship
  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

To register: http://moody.utexas.edu/students/radio-tv-film-internship-courses
 

NON-MAJOR COURSES

RTF 301N         GLOBAL BOLLYWOOD • TUPUR CHATTERJEE (CHATTOPADHYAY)
The term “Bollywood” (a blend of Bombay and Hollywood) is often used to describe Hindi films produced out of the Indian film industry based in Mumbai (formerly Bombay). Bollywood today is more than just cinema: it has become a global culture industry that encompasses a gamut of commodities, like music, dance, and fashion, becoming synonymous with “Indian culture.” However, the Bollywoodization of Indian cinema/culture has been strongly criticized by several scholars, industry professionals, fans and commentators. They have argued that the term perpetuates the long history of colonization and subordination of “others” by the West, and in this case, Hollywood. Yet, it cannot be denied that “Bollywood” does signify cultural pride. How did Bombay cinema become Bollywood? Focusing on this key question, this course will examine Hindi cinema’s pre and post globalization representations of nation, family, diaspora, religion, gender, relationships and cultural traditions to help us understand a complex and contentious term like “Bollywood.” By locating the Bombay film industry within its contemporary global political economy we will examine the local, national and transnational appeals of a mammoth cinema-culture. 

RTF 301N         I Love Lucy, TELEVISION, AND THE 1950S • PETER KOVACS
Are you an I Love Lucy fan? If not this is the chance to become one! This class traces the evolution of one of America’s funniest, most popular and longest running sitcoms from its inception in 1951 to its reincarnation as The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show during the 1957/58 TV season. By discussing the development of the hit series in chronological order, you will learn not only about the history of early television, but also the fascinating time period of the 1950s. During the semester we will explore a wide variety of interrelated topics such as basic structures of US commercial broadcasting, the evolution of the advertiser supported business model, the rapid rise of consumerism, and representation of class, race and gender in the 1950s.

RTF 305          INTRODUCTION MEDIA STUDIES-WB • JOE STRAUBHAAR

Introduction to historical, cultural, political, economic, and international characteristics of film, television, and other media in society. Also taught as a Web-based course
.


RTF 306          INTRODUCTION TO WORLD CINEMA HISTORY • CAROLINE FRICK

Love the movies? Join us and explore how the movies developed from a circus amusement to multinational industry as well as how film can be understood as socio-cultural, technological, aesthetic and economic artifact. Global in scope, this course will sample a variety of “national cinemas” in order to compare and contrast how moviemaking developed uniquely in different parts of the world. We will also address how decades of popular and critical attention to the glamour and gossip surrounding Hollywood movies has affected our understanding of “American” cinema. Designed for students who have not taken previous coursework in film or media studies.

LOWER DIVISION COURSES

RTF 307          MEDIA AND SOCIETY • HOGEUN SEO, ADOLFO  MORA, KYLE  WRATHER
This course surveys the role of media in our society through understanding economic, social, political, organizational, ideological, and global contexts. We will discuss themes relevant to media representation, audience interpretation, and social consequences.

RTF 308          DEVELOPMENT OF FILM AND MEDIA • KATHY FULLER-SEELEY

This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF 317          NARRATIVE STRATEGIES & MEDIA DESIGN • RAMNA WALIA, PETER  KUNZA, NICHOLAS BESTOR
This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames.

RTF 318          INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE AND SOUND • DEB LEWIS

This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project. 

UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES

RTF 322C        FILM HISTORY (aka "FILM HISTORY TO 1960") • CHARLES RAMIREZ BERG
This course is a survey of international film history for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of the history and aesthetics of the motion picture. On a weekly basis, it consists of two 75-minute lectures and a screening of a feature-length film. All RTF majors interested in learning more about the development of the motion picture are welcome, regardless of concentration. The course will cover the history of the medium from beginning (Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers) to 1960.  While the history of cinema will be looked at from various perspectives (as a technology, an industry, an entertainment medium, and a mode of personal and national expression), particular attention will be given to the evolution and development of film’s formal elements. Several written assignments are designed to acquaint students with how research in film history is conducted; in addition, three exams are also required.

RTF 323C        SCREENING RACE • MARY BELTRAN
An introduction to the study of race and ethnicity in U.S. film, television, and new media, this course is designed to provide students with the language and critical tools to understand and discuss racial and ethnic representation and production issues in U.S. film and entertainment television. We will survey the history and evolving representations of race and ethnicity in the entertainment media and related topics of concern to media producers, audiences, and scholars. While a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches will be reviewed, critical and cultural studies approaches to film and television criticism will be emphasized.

This course focuses on the representation of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives in narrative film and television, as well as on Middle Eastern/Arab, Jewish, and European American representation and the construction of “whiteness.” In addition, intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, and citizenship with race and ethnicity in mediated representation will be explored. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have already taken RTF 316M.

RTF 324C        INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL MEDIA • SHANTI KUMAR
This course critically examines the role that film, television, video games, and digital media play in shaping our sense of global, national, and local cultures. It focuses on the role of global media institutions in society, and also examines how diverse audiences use global media to negotiate with issues of cultural identity in everyday life. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a broad range of issues and debates in the field of global media studies.

RTF 326C        TECHNOLOGICAL CULTURE • BRENDAN GAUGHEN
This course asks big questions about the relationship between technology and culture, including how technology influences and is influenced by social factors and forces, and how US culture has framed technology through ideas about progress, convenience, determinism and control.  The course will examine the design, development and use of several communication technologies through a technology studies framework, and consider contemporary problems and conflicts at the intersection of technology and culture.

RTF 345           EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA, ART OF DISRUPTION • KATHLEEN TYNER
This course explores experimental and avant-garde media with a particular focus on North American artists.   Through the intentional disruption of mainstream media aesthetics and conventions, experimental media artists confront, question, and recontextualize the traditional narratives and conventions of commercial media.  In the process, they create dynamic tensions between artists and audiences that transform the reception of both mainstream and innovative media content. The course examines a portfolio of experimental work across genre, including narrative and non-narrative film, title sequences, the use of media performance and gallery installations, public art, online interactive formats, and experimental video games.

Through active viewing of experimental and non-narrative media, students gain familiarity with seminal avant-garde media artists within the contexts of artistic movements in the fine arts and popular culture.  The course includes opportunities for the production of simple, individual and collaborative projects that explore the uses of experimental form, aesthetics and content for creative disruption and social expression.

RTF 345        **ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR** LANDSCAPE & CINEMA (meets with RTF 386) LALITHA GOPALAN
Landscapes have surfaced in cinema since its inception, highlighting the long shadows cast by painting and photography on composition of panoramas and vistas. Yet, the film camera with its predilection for movement asserts its own singularity. This course particularly turns to post-war cinemas to explore how war, decolonization, and nationalism heralded a shift away from earlier forms of panoramas onscreen; ruins, debris, earthquakes, waste and so on, impinge on anterior concepts of the pastoral.  Such a focus on landscapes, the course suggests reconfigures the scholarship on global cinemas that has far too long been considered under distinct categories such as national, new waves, festival, experimental, and art house films.

This course will be structured in a seminar format similar to graduate-level or honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course. Class is capped at 15 students.

RTF 359           ASIAN AMERICAN MEDIA CULTURES • MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA
This course will examine diverse representations of Asian Americans in the US media by focusing on popular film, television, videogames and the World Wide Web. It will critically interrogate stereotypical images of Asian American identities, culture, and politics as well as representations that challenge and contest such stereotypes. In doing so, the course will locate the politics of representing Asian Americans in the US media within a broader historical, political and cultural context that includes issues of immigration, nationalism and citizenship, race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality and transnationalism.

RTF 359           **ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR** MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE (meets with RTF 389) SHANTI KUMAR
Drawing on the current debates in media and cultural theory, this course provides in-depth analyses of a wide range of issues in media and popular culture-- such the changing nature of production and consumption in digital culture, representations of race, gender, class in the media, and the growing centrality of regulations and surveillance in everyday life. The goal of this course is to help students develop the theoretical and methodological skills necessary to critically evaluate the reciprocal relationship between media and popular culture in the 21st century.

This course will be structured in a seminar format similar to graduate-level or honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course. Class is capped at 15 students.

RTF 359           RACE AND DIGITAL MEDIA CULTURES • S CRAIG WATKINS
Digital media influences virtually every aspect of everyday life and shapes how we live, work, and play.  In this course we consider how digital media cultures—the Internet, social media, video games, civic tech—interact with race in complex ways.  More specifically, the course is organized around four key thematic areas.  First, we consider shifts in what is generally referred to as the digital divide to address how the adoption of technology has evolved over the last three decades.  Second, we look at the terrain of media and representation with a specific emphasis on how social media (i.e., think Twitter), games, and user-generated content (think YouTube) influence media narratives about race.   The third section explores some of the current debates about race, technology, and the economy.  In a technology-driven economy how does race continue to matter in terms of employment, opportunity, and social mobility?  The final section of the course explores the explosive shifts in civic tech and civic life and probes: how has the rise of digital media culture—social media, mobile technologies, and citizen journalism—transformed the sphere of racial politics?

RTF 359S         DOCUMENTING DIFFERENCE • CURRAN NAULT
This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary as a vital practice of minority activism and self-representation/preservation. Students will be introduced to influential documentaries across a wide range of styles and modes (poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive, performative), and will explore critical topics in documentary production and reception: fictions of realism, authenticity and objectivity; propaganda and persuasion; histories of ethnography and orientalism; questions of documentary ethics; narrative/formal strategies of activist resistance; autobiographical documentaries and the politics of self-representation; mockumentaries and the undoing of truth. Class assignments will combine written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentary or documentary prospectus for their final project.

RTF 359S         GENDER AND FAN CULTURE • SUZANNE SCOTT
Over the past decade, fans have been transformed from a stigmatized subculture into a mainstream power demographic, catered to and courted by media industries. This course will survey fan studies from the 1990s to the present, with an emphasis on fandom within convergence culture and digital fan cultures and practices, from fan fiction to fantasy football. Using gender as a critical axis, this course will consider the lingering impact of fan studies’ roots in feminist and queer media studies, and contemplate how gender shapes our discussions of fan labor, fan representations, fannish taste, modes of fan performance and production, and industry-audience power dynamics. Finally, this course will consider what forms of identity work have been elided or marginalized as a result of the field’s focus on gender as its central critical axis, in an effort to move towards a more intersectional conception of fan identity and fan studies. In addition to critically analyzing fans' transformative works, students will mobilize course concepts to produce and theorize fan texts of their own.

RTF 359S         LATINA FEMINISMS AND MEDIA • MARY BELTRAN
This upper-division undergraduate course surveys Chicana and Latina feminist scholarship, activism, and creative expression, with an emphasis on Latina media production and representation in U.S. entertainment media.  We will explore the rise and development of Latina activism and feminisms in relation to the Chicana/o, Puerto Rican, and U.S. women’s movements and in relation to historical and social contexts for women and girls of Mexican American and other U.S. Latina heritage.  The last half of the course will survey scholarship on Latina participation and representation in mediated popular culture and strategies of resistance enacted through Latina film and media production.

RTF 365.10       GLOBALIZATION AND SOCIAL MEDIA • WENHONG CHEN
What are social media doing to us? And we to them? Drawing on literatures from media studies, sociology, communication, and management, this course invites students to engage in critical analysis of the causes, patterns, and consequences of using social media in a global context.  Building on cases from diverse cultures and nations, the course provides a rich comparative perspective. The course has three components.

  • We start with major debates on the role of communication and media technologies in network society, globalization, and transnationalism.
  • In the second part, we focus on how macro social forces and institutions such as state and market shape the development of social media and other new communication technologies. We explore how social inequalities and cultural differences affect digital divides.
  • In the third part, we investigate how social media and other new technologies have facilitated changes in politics, organizations, networks, as well as media and culture.

RTF 365D        MEDIA LITERACY AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT • KATHLEEN TYNER
Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and produce communication in a variety of forms. This course explores the expanding nature of literacy in a digital world with particular focus on its role in social and political contexts. Through the use of new media tools and an awareness of the historical uses of literacy for civic engagement and action, students will explore the way that media have been used to change society over time. Relationships between print, broadcast and digital media are explored to analyze the content and contexts of a wide variety of media messages. Students will design innovative presentations and projects that take advantage of new media tools and messages. Dialogue related to the ethical uses of media is central to the course.

RTF 368S         MEDIA STUDIES THESIS
Hour(s) to be arranged. Restricted enrollment; contact the department for permission to register for this class. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Advanced media studies research. An independent research project based on primary data, resulting in a written summary of theoretical foundations, methodological approach, results, and a discussion. Restricted to radio-television-film majors. Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of faculty sponsor.


RTF 370           ASIAN HORROR FILM • LALITHA GOPALAN
This course assumes the student’s familiarity with classical horror films, European and American films to be precise, and all the attendant theories on genre and spectatorship.  While the established theoretical tracts have taken American and European films as their models, they seem totally unprepared for the vibrant horror films emerging from Asia, India to Japan, and this is exactly our charge for the course—to better understand the cinematic style of Asian horror films. As any cinephile would testify while these films have the stock figures of ghosts and monsters, haunted houses and possessed women, they also question our settled ideas of beauty and disgust that imperceptibly shape our notions of racial, sexual, and national differences. The course will consider how questions of national style and authorship revise the ways in which we consider genre cinema.

RTF 370           FILMS OF CLINT EASTWOOD • TOM SCHATZ
This course examines the career of Clint Eastwood, from his rise to stardom in Sergio Leone's "spaghetti Westerns" in the 1960s and the iconic Dirty Harry films of the 1970s through his steady development as an important filmmaker in his own right (and a distinctive “hyphenate” producer-director-star) with films like Unforgiven, Mystic River, Million Dollar Baby, and American Sniper. The structure of the course is historical (and chronological), but the main thrust is critical, combining various approaches – principally star, genre, and auteur analysis; narrative and textual analysis; and theories of gender and sexuality.  We also consider how Eastwood's career as both star and filmmaker relates to the development of the Hollywood movie industry at large over the past half-century.

This is a writing-intensive course and the brunt of the work will involve critical writing, including a few short critiques, a major research paper and in-class essay final.

UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

RTF 333           INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING • TOM WILLETT
RTF 333 will introduce you to screenwriting, and the primary forms which writing for the screen may take: features, shorts, television and documentary. We will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. In lecture and sections, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft.

RTF 336           SPECIAL PROJECTS IN RADIO-TV-FILM

RTF 340           MULTI-CAM TELEVISION DIRECTING • DAVID SCHNEIDER
This course will examine the techniques of multi-camera live television directing in numerous formats. It will provide an overview of the current technology and how that technology impacts directing decisions.  Students will learn how directing styles shape various genres of broadcasts and how the director contributes to a successful production.  The course will focus on planning and preparation and elements of production design. The demands of a controlled studio atmosphere will be compared and contrasted with those of live remote sports and entertainment programs. Exercises will acquaint the students with camera placement, shot blocking and shot selection.

RTF 341           AUDIO PRODUCTION: SOUND FOR PICTURE • TODD THOMPSON
Sound Production and Sound Design are known as the “third half of cinema.” This course offers hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of sound production and post for picture. We will explore audio as a craft component of picture media and as a creative practice. Students will learn and apply production techniques to complete several project assignments in Pro Tools that will include sound design, dialogue editing, Foley, ADR, ambiences, creating FX, working with music, preparing for the mix, and your own basic mixes. Much hard work. Much fun. If you could take only one audio class on your path to filmmaking, this would be the one.

RTF 343           ADVANCED NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • KAT CANDLER
From script to sound design, students spend the semester completing an advanced video production (3 - 10 minutes). Emphasis is placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Students are not required to direct, but must participate in the key crew positions on various projects for full credit.

RTF 343N        ADVANCED 3D PRODUCTION • BUZZ HAYS
This class will focus exclusively on student projects, exposing students to several very different types of collaborations. All projects will be produced and edited in a group lab environment, in collaboration with fellow students and under the supervision of UT3D staff. Successful completion of the Intro to 3D class with at least a grade of B is required for registration.

RTF 344M       COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR FILM & GAMES • BEN BAYS
In-depth study and practice of 3D modeling, surfacing, lighting, compositing, animation and visual FX using Autodesk Maya, Adobe Photoshop, and other programs.

RTF 344M       INTRODUCTION TO VFX & MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS, WILEY AKINS
This is a production course designed to introduce and expand your knowledge of the world of motion graphics and special effects. Credits, transitions, greenscreen, filters, masks, mattes, all sorts of things. In contrast to the animation course, this class will focus on advanced compositing and techniques to enrich your video, stills, typography and to get exactly what you want to see onscreen. You will not be required to draw anything (complicated). Consider this more of a course in design than art. We will take the elements of design: line, shape, value, texture, color, direction, size, perspective and space and add one more thing to them: time.

RTF 344M       WRITING INTERACTIVE GAMES/MEDIA • SUSAN O'CONNOR
Video games and other interactive media increasingly require well-crafted storylines and strong characters.  This workshop is designed to give aspiring game writers the skills, knowledge and techniques needed to write successfully for the games industry.  Through the creation of original interactive games, students will focus on such fundamentals as premise, character development, story structure, and the creation of multi-level worlds.

RTF 344N        ADVANCED VFX & MOTION GRAPHICS • BEN BAYS
Students organize, research and create projects based on advanced compositing and visual effects techniques.  Topics include Particles and Simulations, 3D animation, and Digital Matte painting. Students must have taken RTF 344M -Visual Effects or RTF  344M - Comp. Animation and 3-D Modeling in order to take RTF 344M - Advanced Visual Effects.

RTF 344N        GAME DEVELOPMENT CAPSTONE: 2D GAMES* • PAUL TOPRAC
The Capstone Game Development course brings together students from Computer Science, College of Fine Arts, and Radio-TV-Film to form small teams in which each student will contribute specialized knowledge to the group creation of 2D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms.  Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 2D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios.  
*If interested, please read instructions to apply.  Consent of instructor required.

RTF 346           INTRODUCTION TO EDITING • DON HOWARD, KAREN KOCHER, LAUREN KINSLER
Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.


RTF 346E         ADVANCED EDITING • ANNE LEWIS
This course is a further elaboration of the principles and techniques of editing students will have encountered in RTF 346, building a broader technical background for professional development. We will discuss aesthetic, technical, and practical approaches to editing and consider how they might best apply to some (provided) editing challenges. In particular, we'll concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a range of material and creative solutions to editing challenges. Taught using AVID software.


RTF 351C         INTRODUCTION TO 2D ANIMATION • LANCE MYERS
This course will introduce the student to the art and mechanics of two-dimensional animation in film and in digital media. Weekly exercises will be required, with an emphasis on animation as personal expression.

RTF 366D         DIRECTING WORKSHOP • ANDREW SHEA, MIGUEL ALVAREZ
This workshop explores the role of the director in the process of translation from page to screen, focusing on the director/actor relationship, narrative structure and visual language. Assignments will include the casting, mounting and realization of dramatic narrative scenes. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the skills necessary to communicate effectively with actors to achieve authentic and vivid performances.

RTF 366K         MUSIC FILM PRODUCTION • PJ RAVAL
Students in this course will create music videos, short-form music documentaries and a live music/film performance.  This is an intensive production course that will require ongoing creative work.  Film students without music experience and music students without film experience are welcome in the class. We will work with original music, local musicians and/or creative commons copyright-free music to create innovative music videos.  We will discover local subjects for music documentaries.

We will screen and analyze music videos and films by directors who are also established feature directors, including Mark Romanek, Martin Scorcese, Ondi Timoner, Michael Apted and Michel Gondry featuring artists such as R.E.M., Laurie Anderson, Lady Gaga, Arcade Fire, Bjork, OK GO, Pearl Jam and others. We will have in-class visits from local music video and music documentary directors and producers including Bradley Beasley (Flaming Lips) and Karen Bernstein (Lou Reed, Ella Fitzgerald).

RTF 366K         NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • DEB LEWIS, STEVE MIMS, NANCY SCHIESARI
The class explores the expressive potential of sound and image through the production of digital video and 16mm exercises and short films. It is an intensive workshop in visual storytelling and non-dialogue filmmaking. It is designed to build upon the fundamental production concepts and techniques that were introduced in RTF 318 and to prepare students for the advanced narrative classes.


RTF 366K         INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION • SHELBY HADDEN
This class introduces students to single-camera field documentary video production. Basic instruction will be provided on digital cameras and digital off-line editing. Individual exercises and group projects will be assigned throughout the semester.

RTF 366M        INTRODUCTION TO 3D PRODUCTION • BUZZ HAYS
This gateway course, in which students learn the theory and history of stereoscopic 3D, along with current production techniques and business/industry considerations, will include lectures, readings, screenings of 3D films, and hands-on skill training. Pre-requisites for the course include RTF 317 and RTF 318 with a grade of B- or better and six additional hours of lower division RTF coursework.

RTF 367K         PRODUCING FILM AND TELEVISION • MICAH BARBER
RTF 367K will detail how things work in the supposedly noncreative side of the entertainment industry. The course will focus on the function and duties of a producer as he or she shepherds an idea through a project "life cycle": development, financing, pre-production, post-production, marketing and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers.

RTF 367P         ADVANCED PRODUCING: SCRIPT TO SCREEN • SCOTT RICE
Script to Screen takes students behind the scenes of the 2016 film FREE STATE OF JONES written and directed by Gary Ross (THE HUNGER GAMES) and starring Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey (INTERSTELLAR). By studying the movie’s source material, script, shot lists, storyboards, shooting schedule, VFX, final cut and even exclusive behind the scenes footage, students will garner insight into the production of a major Hollywood feature. This class also gives students practical instruction on producing their own projects including web series, shorts, commercials and indie features. From guidance on pitching to the ins and outs of founding a production company, Script to Screen is an essential “how-to” for students who are serious about a career in production. RTF students who do not meet the prerequisites but have experience in either directing or screenwriting may be able to gain admittance into the class by contacting the instructor.    
Non-majors will not be allowed to add this course.

RTF 368           CINEMATOGRAPHY • JOHN FIEGE
This course explores visual storytelling and the art of cinematography through practice in a workshop environment. We will explore visual expression through a variety of cinema tools including camera and lighting as well as time, movement and color. Students are encouraged to think cinematically in both fiction and non-fiction approaches. A number of readings and exercises are assigned to also increase a student's technical knowledge and understanding of one's tools, leading to greater creative and personal visual expression.

RTF 368           IMMERSIVE MEDIA PRODUCTION • DEEPAK CHETTY
This class will introduce basic concepts of “Immersive Media,” as it applies to virtual reality and stereoscopic 3D content. We will rely on basic production techniques regarding spherical photography as well as more advanced completely computer-based techniques, as students move from creating content in the virtual (compute-generated) and photoreal realm.  All content created will be intended for use on HMD (head mounted displays) such as the Oculus Rift or Samsung Gear VR.

Qualified students should have had some experience with 3D software—Maya, Unity, or another game development program. The class will primarily be using the Unreal Engine. Official pre-requisite will be any one of the following classes, or the consent of the instructor:

  • 344M – 3 Visual Effects and Motion Graphics
  • 344M – 2 Comp Graph for Film and Games
  • 366M Introduction to 3D production

Consent applications may be forwarded as an attachment to rtf-submissions@austin.utexas.edu.

RTF 368C         ADVANCED DIRECTING • ANDREW SHEA
This course is designed to bring together advanced directing and acting students in an environment that will foster mutual growth and understanding of the director/actor dynamic in the filmmaking process.  The class will work closely with Lucien Douglas's Acting For The Camera course in the Department of Theatre & Dance.  Each student will direct or co-direct a Dogme-style film in which the Theatre & Dance actors play the leading roles.  We will adhere to a production code that is a modified version of the Dogme 95 Vow of Cinematic Chastity.  The goal will be to create collaborative, performance-based works that emphasize simplicity and ingenuity in image and sound choices.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV PILOTS • BEAU THORNE
Each student will create a brand new television show (30 or 60 minute, network or cable) from the ground up: researching the setting and historical moment, inventing the characters and relationships, and ultimately designing the conflicts necessary to propel a show through multiple seasons.  Students will then distill all of this work into a single showpiece episode - a pilot - that demonstrates the artistic and commercial potential of the new show.  We’ll also be looking at a range of produced pilots (both aired and unaired) and discussing what makes the best of them work. 

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV SPECS • STUART KELBAN
This course explores writing for series television.   Over the course of the semester, students will write "spec" scripts of an existing half hour comedy and hour-long drama.  The class will take an in-depth look at TV writing from the inside out, learning how to "break" an episode and how a TV writer's room works.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRTING: SCI-FI/HORROR • BEAU THORNE
This workshop class will focus on horror and science fiction writing - two genres that have provided opportunities for countless new writers in the film industry. Each student will write a feature-length horror or science fiction screenplay and provide weekly notes on their classmates’ work. In addition, we’ll make a semester-long study of the current trends in each genre, reading and analyzing the biggest hits of recent years.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: INDIES • JOHNNY MCCALLISTER
This workshop class is focused on writing screenplays designed for micro-budget, independent production. As students write their own feature-length scripts (90-120 pages) throughout the semester, they will study and analyze completed micro-budget films and their production methods. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING FOR FEATURE FILM • BEAU THORNE, TOM WILLETT
In this class, students will complete a feature-length screenplay (90-120 pages) by the end of the semester. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.


UTLA - SEMESTER IN LOS ANGELES PROGRAM

Note: For a listing of 2016 RTF summer courses, including those at UTLA, see this page: rtf.utexas.edu/undergraduate/courses/2016-summer

RTF 324L        CAREERS IN ENTERTAINMENT - LA • PHIL NEMY

RTF 330L         INTERNSHIP FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA - LA

RTF 347C         HOW HOLLYWOOD WORKS - LA • PHIL NEMY
Tracking the life cycle of motion pictures and television shows from inception of the original ideas all the way through marketing and distribution, this course is designed to explore business topics in the entertainment industry. Through case studies, readings, and guest speakers representing all facets of show business, students will gain a deeper understanding of the business side of the entertainment industry, the commercial challenges facing producers and network and studio executives, and the continual struggle between creativity and the bottom line.

RTF 348           DEVELOPMENT PROCESS OF FILM/TV - LA • DIANE KEREW-SHAW
This course is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the development process in both film and television. Through lectures and discussion with guest speakers, students will gain experience in preparing pitches, coverage, and development notes as they learn to identify strengths and weaknesses of literary material typical of that submitted to studios, networks, and production companies. Topics will include story logic; story structure; character development; dramatic tone; the adaptability of other source material into scripts; and the extensive life cycle by which literary material makes it from page to screen. Further emphasis will be given to generating ideas and concepts; networking and tracking; agent contacts; working for a producer vs. working for a studio; the creative executive position; readers, studio and network story departments, and the script coverage process.

RTF 348           NEW MEDIA/EMERGING ENTERTAINMENT - LA • JAMES FINO
What is new media? From a technical point of view, it’s the emergence of digital computerized or networked information and communication technologies. From an entertainment point of view, digital interactivity provides creative networks for young and old alike, in challenging, thought-provoking and entertaining gaming environments. This course will explore the burgeoning areas of digital entertainment including broadband, video-on-demand, interactive television, mobile entertainment, and interactive digital gaming.