2021 - Fall

Undergraduate Courses – Fall 2021

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

NON MAJOR COURSES
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

UTLA - WOFFORD DENIUS UTLA CENTER FOR ENTERTAINMENT & MEDIA STUDIES (listed on separate site)
INTERNSHIPS


LOWER DIVISION COURSES

 

RTF 307           MEDIA & SOCIETY JENNIFER McCLEAREN

This course surveys the role of media in our society through understanding economic, social, political, organizational, ideological, and global contexts. We will discuss themes relevant to media representation, audience interpretation, and social consequences.

MS minor

RTF 308           DEVELOPMENT OF FILM & MEDIA Hybrid / BlendedLAURA BROWN

This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF 308           DEVELOPMENT OF FILM & MEDIA-WB Web-Based ASH D'HARCOURT

This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF 317           NARRATIVE STRATEGIES & MEDIA DESIGN BRETT SIEGEL

This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames.

RTF 318           INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE & SOUND  DEBORAH EVE LEWIS

This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project.


UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES

RTF 321C        HISTORY OF AMERICAN TELEVISION Web-Based MARY BELTRAN

This course surveys the history of American network television during the 20th century. We will explore the complex ways that technological, social, political, industrial, and cultural factors have interacted to shape the form and content of broadcast, cable, and satellite television. Our discussion of industrial practices and regulatory decisions will be balanced with an analysis of representational and formal-aesthetic practices. The semester will briefly conclude with a consideration of the meaning and implications of digital convergence on contemporary American – and global – media culture.

RTF 321D        FILM HISTORY TO 1960 Web-Based CHARLES RAMIREZ-BERG

This course is a survey of international film history for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of the history and aesthetics of the motion picture. On a weekly basis, it consists of two 75-minute lectures and a screening of a feature-length film. All RTF majors interested in learning more about the development of the motion picture are welcome, regardless of concentration. The course will cover the history of the medium from beginning (Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers) to 1960.  While the history of cinema will be looked at from various perspectives (as a technology, an industry, an entertainment medium, and a mode of personal and national expression), particular attention will be given to the evolution and development of film’s formal elements. Several written assignments are designed to acquaint students with how research in film history is conducted; in addition, three exams are also required.

RTF 323C         SCREENING RACE Web-Based MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA

This course is designed to provide students with the language and critical tools to understand and discuss racial and ethnic representation and production issues in U.S. film and entertainment television. We will survey the history and evolving representations of race and ethnicity in the entertainment media and related topics of concern to media producers, audiences, and scholars. While a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches will be reviewed, critical and cultural studies approaches to film and television criticism will be emphasized. This course carries UT’s Cultural Diversity flag and meets the Moody College of Communication’s Communication and Culture requirement. It focuses on the representation of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives in narrative film and television, as well as on Middle Eastern/Arab, Jewish, and European American representation and the construction of “whiteness.”  In addition, intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, and citizenship with race and ethnicity in mediated representation will be explored.

RTF 324C         INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL MEDIA Web-Based SHANTI KUMAR

This course critically examines the role that film, television, video games, and digital media play in shaping our sense of global, regional, national, and local cultures. It focuses on the role of global media institutions in society, from Hollywood and Netflix, to Bollywood, Korean Wave and telenovelas, and also examines how diverse audiences use global media to negotiate with issues of cultural identity in everyday life. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a broad range of issues and debates in the field of global media studies.

RTF 331P         DIGITAL PLATFORMS AND CULTURES (aka, "DIGITAL MEDIA PLATFORMS") Web-BasedTBA

In modern society, we live our lives on and through digital media platforms. Every day, we use them to contact friends, share memes, watch television, stream music, review restaurants, buy products, find dates, and even access classes. We post and reblog, like and scroll, comment and subscribe, performing the endless creative labor of social media and further blurring the line between work and play. These digital platforms are microcosms of the contemporary media industries and, through them, we can critically examine the affordances, communities, politics, and economics that drive digital media. From Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram to YouTube, Twitch, and Spotify, this course will use social networking and streaming platforms to explore digital technologies, user modifications, participatory cultures, content policies, community guidelines, intellectual property, online piracy, user-generated content, creator compensation, data collection, audience surveillance, media promotion, influencer marketing, and more. By digging deeper into these platforms—their uses and users, celebrities and subcultures, affordances and algorithms—we can interrogate abstract concepts like power and control, agency and collectivity, censorship and surveillance. Anchoring such discussions in platforms, this course will explore what it really means for us to create, share, consume, and ultimately become media commodities in an increasingly digital world.
This course counts towards the Media & Entertainment Industries minor

RTF 345           CONTEMPORARY HORROR CINEMA Hybrid / Blended ALISON MACOR

Horror is one of the most popular and viscerally affecting genres of filmmaking. Examining the long history of the genre and the peculiar appeal of the scary, the shocking, and the monstrous, this course focuses on contemporary examples of the horror genre from both American and international film contexts. Throughout the semester we will delve into how the horror genre explores varied themes of difference in films related to race, gender, and sexuality. This course considers the genre’s enduring popularity, and why the horrific serves as such a fertile ground for a broad range of cultural and political perspectives.

RTF 345           DOCUMENTARY & CREATIVE NONFICTION Hybrid / Blended • CAROLINE FRICK

What do Muhammad Ali, the Tiger King, your local TV news anchor, and the Lumière Brothers have in common?  They have all been featured or otherwise involved in the creation of non-fiction film and media.  Reality shows, true crime dramas, Academy Award-winning documentaries, newsreels, and more have contributed to the so-called “blurred boundaries” between truth and fiction as represented on screen.  This course will feature a look at a wide range of non-fiction genres through carefully selected readings, screenings, and more.

RTF 345           MUSICALS AND "AMERICA" • MARY BELTRAN

The American musical has long been a popular genre through which storytellers, performers and audiences reimagine who we are with respect to norms of gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. It also has been a forum for stories about social issues of the day, with its conventions as popular entertainment allowing boundary-pushing content to be given voice. Musicals and “America” surveys the genre’s history and evolution, with an emphasis on musical films and television series since the 1950s, and provides tools for critical analysis of musical narratives, performances, audio-visual integration, and representations of gender, sexual orientation, race, and ethnicity across the decades. We’ll watch a number of important films in this history (including Rent, Show Boat, Oklahoma!, Funny Girl, Hair, Zoot Suit, and Hamilton), and read and respond to scholarship on Hollywood and Broadway musicals, with a focus on the ways in which cinematic renditions of song and dance make meaning.

RTF 347P/380D         BUSINESS OF HOLLYWOOD ALISA PERREN

What is going on in the media industries today? What kinds of issues and challenges are entertainment industry professionals dealing with? This class has two key goals: First, students will learn how the media industries operate, gaining a sense of the “big picture” of the contemporary film, television, and digital video landscape. Large-scale issues being faced by those working in the entertainment industry – including the impact of conglomerate ownership, regulation, globalization, and digitization on creative practices and work roles – will be addressed through readings and class discussion. Second, students will hear from a range of guest speakers coming from Hollywood, New York, and Texas about their personal experiences navigating the media business, past and present. While some of those visiting the class will work in production and postproduction (writing, directing, editing, etc.), most of the guests will work in other types of creative, managerial, and executive roles (e.g., studio and network development, acquisitions, marketing, talent management, etc.).

RTF 359S           CHICANA/O FILM Hybrid / BlendedMIRASOL ENRIQUEZ

This course will investigate representations of Chicanos/as, both on-screen and behind the scenes of U.S. films. We will begin with a brief overview of representations of Mexicans/Mexican-Americans in U.S. film from the silent era through the 1960s. The remainder of the class will focus on films made by, for, and about Chicanos/as and Mexican-Americans from the Chicano Movement of the 1960s/70s to the present day. Feature-length, short, experimental, narrative, and documentary films from the first, second, and third waves of Chicano cinema will be examined. While the majority of the texts we will be looking at were made by Chicano/a filmmakers, we will also examine key works by non-Chicano filmmakers who have made significant contributions to the representation of Chicanos/as on film. We will consider historical, economic, industrial, social, and political factors affecting Chicanos/as access to and participation in the film industry, as well as their representation on-screen. Manifestations of gender bias in the Chicano movement, film industry, and writing of film history will be of particular interest, as will the following themes: film as a tool for social change; the construction of individual, ethnic, and national identity; the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality; the politics of representation; the commodification of Latinidad; cultures of production; and issues of authorship and creative control.

RTF 359S           QUEER MEDIA STUDIES CURRAN NAULT

This course immerses students in the critical and theoretical analysis of queer media in order to explore dominant strategies used by the media industries, as well as those utilized by LGBTQI independents and subcultures. Important to this project are historical shifts in representation, including the mainstreaming of queerness, and the alternative media reception, production and exhibition practices developed by LGBTQI communities. Marginalized queer identities (including qpoc and transgender) will be centralized and the intersections of queer identities, queer politics and media culture will be engaged.

RTF 370             FILMS OF BILLY WILDER •  NOAH ISENBERG

This course explores the films of Billy Wilder, from his earliest efforts as a screenwriter in Weimar Germany to the more famous, award-winning work he undertook as a writer-director in Hollywood. We will examine his multi-year partnerships with American writers Charles Brackett (The Major and the Minor, The Lost Weekend, A Foreign Affair, Sunset Boulevard) and I.A.L. Diamond (Love in the Afternoon, Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Buddy Buddy), and his independent work (Double Indemnity, Ace in the Hole, Stalag 17, The Seven Year Itch). We also look at the mentorship he received from other directors, notably Ernst Lubitsch (Ninotchka) and Howard Hawks (Ball of Fire). Among the chief focal points are: the question of authorship, personal style, and film aesthetics; the strictures of genre; working within and outside the studio system; casting, character, and recurrent players.

RTF 370            COMEDY IN FILM AND MEDIA • KATHY FULLER-SEELEY

This course explores theories of humor and comedy and applies them to media and performance from the early 20th century US to the present. Readings draw broadly from philosophy, cultural studies, cinema and TV studies, race, gender, sexuality, politics, psychology. We will examine producers, texts, performers and audiences across a wide variety of media -- television and film, literature, comics, radio, internet, live performance and other forms. The seminar will be focused on student group discussion and presentation of theories, texts, specific examples of applications, and findings. Students will develop research/and/or create projects

RTF 377H/387C   GLOBAL SPORTS MEDIA *ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR* • JENNIFER McCLEAREN

Sports adopt numerous forms around the globe that tell vivid stories about the locations and cultures from which they come. Our myths, ideologies, and narratives embed themselves in sports media, which become windows into broader issues such as nationalism, international relations, immigration, human rights, and a plethora of other matters. This course examines sports media as a cultural, political, and economic phenomenon that are simultaneously nationalizing and globalizing forces. We interrogate the ways in which sports function as sites of contestation on local, regional, national, and international scales. The course will study sports media from a cultural studies perspective, which considers how power struggles operate through sports and who is advantaged and disadvantaged in this process. Topics may include colonialism, diasporas, regional and global fandoms, sports and development, racialized bodies and exploitation, human rights violations and sports mega-events like the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup, American exceptionalism, and human trafficking.

This course will be structured in a seminar format similar to graduate-level or honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course. Class is capped at 18 students.



UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

 

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION Web-BasedBEN BAYS

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce content for a variety of media including live action film, classical and 3D animation and interactive formats like video games and XR.  This course will teach you the industry standard tools and practical techniques of digital media production, no experience necessary.  The course is self-paced, non-linear and offers a variety of options.  Students choose their area of interest from a large array of assignments covering topics like concept art and previsualization, color correction and post production, animation and simulation, compositing and visual effects or CGI and interactive game design (and more).  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? Choose your own path and the instructor and a team of TAs collaborate with you.  No prior knowledge of digital media production required.  Mac or PC.  No software purchase required. This course offers both access to instructor guidance and the ability to complete assignments at your own pace. OPEN TO BOTH RTF MAJORS & NON-RTF MAJORS.

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RTF 333        INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING TOM WILLETT

RTF 333 will introduce you to screenwriting, and the primary forms which writing for the screen may take: features, shorts, television and documentary. We will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. In lecture and sections, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft.

RTF 337 / 388P      EARS ONLY: AUDIO STORYTELLING TODD THOMPSON

Audio production and post for storytelling using voice, actuality, music, ambiences and sound effects. Structuring stories for audio only, plus microphone and recorder techniques, mono, stereo, and binaural recording,  field mixers, basic Pro Tools, signal processing, and noise reduction, applicable to sound for picture as well. Students will make a variety of small projects leading up to a longer, final project of their choice.

RTF 340           MULTI-CAM TELEVISION DIRECTING • DAVID SCHNEIDER

This course will examine the techniques of multi-camera live television directing in numerous formats. It will provide an overview of the current technology and how that technology impacts directing decisions. Students will learn how directing styles shape various genres of broadcasts and how the director contributes to a successful production. The course will focus on planning and preparation and elements of production design. The demands of a controlled studio atmosphere will be compared and contrasted with those of live remote sports and entertainment programs. Exercises will acquaint the students with camera placement, shot blocking and shot selection.

RTF 341           AUDIO PRODUCTION INTO POST  TODD THOMPSON

Audio is half of your movie; arguably more than half since it exceeds the limits of the visible frame. It operates at a literal and subliminal level and gives the filmmaker access to deeper parts of the audience’s consciousness. Great audio is a combination of creativity and an understanding of both the science and the tools of the medium.  This is the first-level class for audio, a perfect starting point for people who want to know how to better use sound in their projects as well as for those who may be thinking about audio as a lifelong craft. You will learn production mixing, basic post techniques, and the ideas behind them.  This will include recording on location using both high-end and low-end recorders, especially recording dialog, set and location problems and protocol, basic sound editing, mix prep, and creating a basic mix. You will become familiar with the operation and use of the Sound Devices 633 mixer/recorder and 744T recorder, other production mixers, and microphones on location and in the studio. You will learn the science behind the tools, and cultivate an appreciation for sound as a creative element in storytelling. You will create mixes in Pro Tools for audio-only projects, as well as fully realized soundtracks synced to picture. 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, RTF 317 and 318 with a grade of at least B- in each, and six additional semester hours of lower-division coursework in radio-television-film.

RTF 343            ADVANCED PRODUCTION: MUSIC IN FILM  PJ RAVAL

This course explores the collaborative nature between filmmakers and performing artists. Students will partner with a local musical artist/band to create a portfolio of original short films ranging from live performance videos, to non-fiction and promotional materials, to music videos and ultimately music films. This course embraces conceptual and non-traditional forms of filmmaking often seen in the works of early music video pioneers. From the Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star,” to Beyonce’s “Lemonade,” music videos have defined generations and cultural movements. This course will explore the artistic expressions and subsequent social impacts that music videos have had in steering the public conversations around artist personas, censorship, and cinematic innovation. Please note: Previously listed as 366K Music in Film Production.

RTF 343            ADVANCED PRODUCTION: NARRATIVE MIGUEL ALVAREZ, NANCY SCHIESARI

From script to sound design, students spend the semester completing an advanced video production (3 - 10 minutes). Emphasis is placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Students are not required to direct but must participate in the key crew positions on various projects for full credit.

RTF 343/388P  PRODUCTION DESIGN PRACTICUM ADRIANA SERRANO

This class is structured around the practical aspects of how-to production design your own script.  Students will learn how to develop a design from conceptualization to execution based on the needs of your particular story.  The students will learn how to approach and find creative ways to deliver a design that will contribute to the creation of an effective visual design.

We will cover budgeting, breakdowns, creating specific graphics, drafting, clearances, and basics of set construction.

This class is open to all the students who have some previous experience in film or narrative production.  Each student must have a script that they want to develop for this class.

RTF 343D        CINEMATOGRAPHY  DEB LEWIS

This course explores visual storytelling and the art of cinematography through practice in a workshop environment. We will explore visual expression through a variety of cinema tools including camera and lighting as well as time, movement and color. Students are encouraged to think cinematically in both fiction and non-fiction approaches. A number of readings and exercises are assigned to also increase a student's technical knowledge and understanding of one's tools, leading to greater creative and personal visual expression.

RTF 344M         3D ANIMATION AND DIGITAL PERFORMANCES  BEN BAYS

3D Animation and Digital Performances explores the history, principles and methods of animation and storytelling using CGI. Through the intersection of in-person activities and creative project-based learning, students animate characters, design and render simulations, create compositions in motion, even sequence motion capture data for a variety of formats from live action to cartoons to videogames. Students have the ability to customize the course to their area of interest, whether it is developing expertise in the craft of animation (or one particular aspect of it) to applying these techniques to larger projects. There are as many ways to take the course as there are students. Choose your own path and the instructor collaborates with you to achieve your vision.  No prior knowledge of digital media production required. Mac or PC. No software purchase required.

RTF 344M         CGI FOR FILM AND GAMES Web-Based BEN BAYS

CGI for Film and Games explores the history, principles and methods of 3D Modeling, Surfacing, Animation and Simulation using CGI. This course is self-paced and non-linear: students customize the course according to their area of interest. Topics to choose from include (but are not limited to) creating concept art for CGI, modeling and sculpting hard surfaces and organic characters, designing virtual sets and game levels, procedurally generating flora, hair, fur and terrain, painting (and photographing) textures, simulating effects, lighting and virtual cinematography, real-time (game engine) implementation and advanced rendering techniques (and much more). Additionally, there are "combo" projects which allow students to combine their skills into larger ideas like making a cartoon, integrating CGI into live action and creating interactive games. Choose your own path and the instructor collaborates with you to achieve your vision. No prior knowledge of CGI is required. Mac or PC. No software purchase required.

RTF 344M        INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAME DEVELOPMENT DEEPAK CHETTY

This course provides students with the fundamentals of interactive media through digital game creation. The course focuses on two areas: (1) general principles of game design and game development, and (2) development of simple 3D games. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M/388P  POST-PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (COLOR GRADING) One section will be held in person, and one will be  Web-Based SIMON QUIROZ

This class will examine best practices in the finishing and mastering stages of digital post-production for a film or media piece focusing primarily on picture control and quality. The class will reinforce strong habits in media preparation when it comes to editing -- but this is not an editing class. We will depart from the moment the offline edit is done and move forward with preparing assets for online editing, sending them to sound design and mix, integration of VFX to color correction and grading (finishing) and then integration of all these elements (mastering) for deliverables creation. While we will cover color correction and grading, this course will also emphasize the technical elements that allow us to deliver the best quality images possible for different platforms. The concepts of infrastructure, pipeline and workflow should become second nature to the student upon successful completion of this course. Ideally, students should come with a pretty good understanding of nonlinear editing software. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        VIRTUAL PRODUCTION DEEPAK CHETTY

Virtual Production and real-time rendering are here. Learn how to plan, layout, light, animate and render your ideas, concepts and art in real-time using Unreal Engine. Physically accurate cameras will simulate their real-world counterparts and give you the ability to learn and develop your real-world skills in a virtual environment or integrate your real-world skills into the virtual production environment. Final projects, which will be fully realized short-form pieces, will display an understanding of the methodology and creative potential of this game-changing workflow.

RTF 344M        VFX FOR STORYTELLING DEEPAK CHETTY

In this hands-on course, students will be introduced to the new frontiers of VFX technology, including neural networks for VFX (deep learning), Style Transfer, Real-time rendering and mixed reality Stagecraft. These technologies, fast becoming industry standards, are not out of reach! Along with production elements, the class will have screenings and analysis of films that contain historical milestones in VFX, which have led us to the present state of VFX and the development of the industry.  Whether you are interested in VFX as an additional skill in your filmmaker's toolkit or would like to become a visual effects artist and technician, you must understand the past to contextualize the present and the future of this art form. This class explores the production of contemporary and cutting edge VFX as well as both sides of this chronology, with the ultimate goal of creating a well-rounded understanding of where VFX started, and where it is headed. 

RTF 344M        WRITING FOR INTERACTIVE GAMES & MEDIA Hybrid / Blended SUSAN O'CONNOR

Interactive storytelling is a form of dramatic writing, just like theater or television. What makes the medium unique is that the author does not control the story; the audience does. Creatives have only just begun to explore the storytelling possibilities of this field. In this class, you will begin to develop the skills & knowledge necessary to write for interactive mediums such as video games, digital media, VR, and augmented reality. Your final deliverable in this course - a narrative design document - will serve as a writing sample for your portfolio. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344T         GAME DEVELOPMENT CAPSTONE: 2D GAMES PAUL TOPRAC

The Capstone Game Development course brings together students from Computer Science, College of Fine Arts, and Radio-Television-Film to form small teams in which each student will contribute specialized knowledge to the group creation of 2D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms. Through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios and the larger industry, students will gain a thorough understanding of the 2D game development process. Local game companies and industry professionals are committed to evaluating student projects and hiring successful graduates. 
*If interested, please read instructions to apply. Consent of instructor required.

RTF 346           INTRO TO EDITING DON HOWARD, KAREN KOCHER, ANNE LEWIS

Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

RTF 347C         INTRODUCTION TO THE MUSIC BUSINESS SASCHA STONE GUTTFREUND

How did Fyre Fest happen? What does streaming mean for record labels? Why are concert tickets so expensive? What determines the order of artist names on the festival poster? What is the difference between a manager, agent, publicist, promoter or A&R? We are in the era of the young entrepreneur. People in their 20's are able to start a business, and then sell it without acquiring a degree in business or finance. Students in this course will learn how to plan, orchestrate, and oversee their own small music business in the avenue of their choice. We will discuss artist management and representation through the development of recorded music as well as the importance of the touring business for artists today. We will also cover the business of concerts and music festivals; students will learn not only how to book and market shows but also how to produce them. Each class will address a different element of the business and will feature a guest lecturer that will share their story of success and entrepreneurship, followed by an open Q&A with the students.

RTF 347E         ADVANCED EDITING  CHRIS ROLDAN

This course is a further elaboration of the principles and techniques of editing students will have encountered in RTF 346, building a broader technical background for professional development. We will discuss aesthetic, technical, and practical approaches to editing and consider how they might best apply to some (provided) editing challenges. In particular, we'll concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a range of material and creative solutions to editing challenges. Taught using AVID software.

RTF 351C        INTRODUCTION TO 2D ANIMATION LANCE MYERS

This course will introduce the student to the art and mechanics of two-dimensional animation in film and in digital media. Weekly exercises will be required, with an emphasis on animation as personal expression. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors. 

RTF 366K        DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION  NANCY SCHIESARI

This class introduces students to single-camera field documentary video production. During this semester-long documentary workshop, we will screen a variety of documentary works, but our focus will be on making documentary films. There will be group discussions, reading assignments, lectures, hands-on lab instruction, and short documentary exercises, in addition to a culminating documentary project. Students will keep a journal of the documentaries they see and how these films influence the documentaries they make (or plan to make). The primary focus of the class will be working from pre-production to post-production by starting with an idea and finishing with a short documentary film.

RTF 366K DRAWING FOR DESIGNERS JASON BUCHANAN

Course explores storyboards, a set of sequential drawings, that informs a graphic organizer how to illustrate a narrative. Examines use in entertainment applications like film, TV, theatre, gaming, and immersive experiences. Storyboards are also valuable in the development of advertising videos or demonstrating a production process.

RTF 366K         DRAWING THE STORYBOARD • JASON BUCHANAN

Learn the art and skills of drawing a storyboard, even if you can’t draw.

A storyboard is a set of sequential drawings used to tell a story—a graphic organizer that helps to illustrate a narrative.  Used often in entertainment applications like film, TV, theatre, gaming, and immersive experiences, storyboards are also valuable in the development of advertising videos or demonstrating a production process.

RTF 366K/388P   INTRO TO PRODUCTION DESIGN ADRIANA SERRANO

This class explores the world of production design and art direction for film. By watching films, analyzing concepts and using a series of practical projects, students will learn the different components of film design including: script interpretation, mood boards, breakdowns, clearances, scenery, location, props, and color concepts.

The students are required to crew or design one film in collaboration with the RTF students.

RTF 366K        NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • MIGUEL ALVAREZ, MICAH BARBER, ILIANA SOSA

The class explores the expressive potential of sound and image through the production of digital video exercises and short films. It is an intensive workshop in visual storytelling and non-dialogue filmmaking. It is designed to build upon the fundamental production concepts and techniques that were introduced in RTF 318 and to prepare students for the advanced narrative classes.

RTF 366K         COLLABORATIVE FAN CONTENT (aka RTF MEETS ROOSTER TEETH) MICAH BARBER

Create your own original short content while learning how Rooster Teeth thinks about the things they make. You’ll see how to bring your audience into the creative process from the start, learn from Rooster Teeth’s successes in emerging social media entertainment, and explore the role of community in the future of digital media. Creative and business executives will be regular guests throughout the semester, including exclusive sessions taught by media executive Jordan Levin, General Manager of Rooster Teeth and prominent UT alum.

RTF 366K/388P       PRODUCING: DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION-WB Web-Based • SARAH SEULKI OH

Marketing/Distribution is at the heart of film business as it performs a critical role in connecting films to audiences. Yet filmmakers and producers often do not think about marketing/distribution until the film is made. In this course, we will overview the role of the producer during the development stages and also familiarize ourselves with the marketing/distribution process of a motion picture, not only at the business end but also as a key part to the development and creative process. Students will workshop and develop a project from early inception to a fully formed pitch package that will include a distribution strategy. Throughout the semester, exclusive sessions will be taught by Kyle Davies, the former President of Domestic Distribution at Paramount Pictures who oversaw the release of dozens of movies, including ­Arrival, Fences, Transformers: The Last Knight, Annihilation, and recent hits A Quiet Place, Book Club and Mission: Impossible – Fallout

RTF 367D        DIRECTING WORKSHOP ANDREW SHEA, YA'KE SMITH

This workshop explores the role of the director in the process of translation from page to screen, focusing on the director/actor relationship, narrative structure and visual language. Assignments will include the casting, mounting, and realization of dramatic narrative scenes. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the skills necessary to communicate effectively with actors to achieve authentic and vivid performances.

RTF 367K        PRODUCING FILM AND TELEVISION MICAH BARBER

RTF 367K will detail how things work in the supposedly noncreative side of the entertainment industry. The course will focus on the function and duties of a producer as he or she shepherds an idea through a project "life cycle": development, financing, pre-production, post-production, marketing and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers.

RTF 367Q        ADVANCED PRODUCING: SCRIPT TO SCREEN SCOTT RICE

Script to Screen takes students behind the scenes of Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey’s films. By studying script drafts, shot lists, storyboards, early edits and even exclusive behind the scenes footage, students will garner insight into the making of a major Hollywood feature. Script to Screen also gives students practical instruction on producing their own projects including web series, shorts, commercials, and indie features. From guidance on pitching to the ins and outs of founding a production company, Script to Screen is an essential “how-to” for students who are serious about producing and directing.

Prerequisites: Upper Division standing and either RTF 367K (Producing I), RTF 366D (Directing Workshop) or RTF 333 (Intro. to Screenwriting). Non-majors will not be allowed to add this course. If you do not meet the prerequisites you may seek admittance by contacting the instructor.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: FEATURES TOM WILLETT

In this class, students will complete a feature-length screenplay (90-120 pages) by the end of the semester. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: INDIES TOM WILLETT

This workshop class is focused on writing screenplays designed for micro-budget, independent production. As students write their own feature-length scripts (90-120 pages) throughout the semester, they will study and analyze completed micro-budget films and their production methods. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: SCI-FI/HORROR MAYA PEREZ

This workshop class will focus on horror and science fiction writing—two genres that have provided opportunities for countless new writers in the film industry. Each student will write a feature-length horror or science fiction screenplay and provide weekly notes on their classmates’ work. In addition, we’ll make a semester-long study of the current trends in each genre, reading and analyzing the biggest hits of recent years.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV PILOTS KATHERINE KRAFT

Each student will create a brand new television show (30- or 60-minute, network or cable) from the ground up: researching the setting and historical moment, inventing the characters and relationships, and ultimately designing the conflicts necessary to propel a show through multiple seasons. Students will then distill all of this work into a single showpiece episode - a pilot - that demonstrates the artistic and commercial potential of the new show. We’ll also be looking at a range of produced pilots (both aired and unaired) and discussing what makes the best of them work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV SPECS KATHERINE KRAFT

This course explores writing for series television. Over the course of the semester, students will write "spec" scripts of an existing half-hour comedy and hour-long drama. The class will take an in-depth look at TV writing from the inside out, learning how to "break" an episode and how a TV writer's room works.


INTERNSHIPS

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RTF 130N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
 
RTF 130 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330.The purpose of this course for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors. 
 
RTF 330N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
 
The purpose of this 3-hour internship for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors. 
 
RTF 630N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
 
The purpose of this 6-hour internship for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors. 

NON-MAJOR COURSES

 

RTF 303C         INTRO TO MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRIES–WB Web-Based WENHONG CHEN

Restricted to non-RTF majors. Fulfills the social & behavioral sciences core curriculum requirement for the 2019–2020 academic year.
Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a social science understanding of media industries and entrepreneurship. We start with a survey of key social science theories and concepts the media landscape. We examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile media and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media organizations and professionals. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. It is designed to help students achieve the following goals upon successful course completion:

  • Understand key social science theories, concepts and methods on the complicated interaction between media and society.
  • Recognize various opportunities, challenges, and responses media industries have to address due to globalization and technological advancements.
  • Understand government policies and industry practices that affect the formation and function of media organizations.
  • Understand the trajectory and development of various legacy and new media industry sectors.
  • Evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, challenges, and process in the media industries facilitated and constrained by institution and culture.

RTF 306         INTRODUCTION TO WORLD CINEMA HISTORY –WB Web-Based CAROLINE FRICK

Restricted to non-RTF majors.
Love the movies? Join us and explore how the movies developed from a circus amusement to multinational industry as well as how film can be understood as socio-cultural, technological, aesthetic and economic artifact. Global in scope, this course will sample a variety of “national cinemas” in order to compare and contrast how moviemaking developed uniquely in different parts of the world. We will also address how decades of popular and critical attention to the glamour and gossip surrounding Hollywood movies has affected our understanding of “American” cinema. The course fulfills VAPA requirements, and is designed for non-RTF majors who have not taken previous coursework in film or media studies.
 

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION–WB  Web-BasedBEN BAYS

Open to BOTH RTF Majors & Non-RTF Majors.
Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce content for a variety of media including live action film, classical and 3D animation and interactive formats like video games and XR.  This course will teach you the industry standard tools and practical techniques of digital media production, no experience necessary.  The course is self-paced, non-linear and offers a variety of options.  Students choose their area of interest from a large array of assignments covering topics like concept art and previsualization, color correction and post production, animation and simulation, compositing and visual effects or CGI and interactive game design (and more).  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? Choose your own path and the instructor and a team of TAs collaborate with you.  No prior knowledge of digital media production required.  Mac or PC.  No software purchase required. This course offers both access to instructor guidance and the ability to complete assignments at your own pace.

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RTF 330N   INTERNSHIP IN MEDIA INDUSTRIES 

Restricted to non-RTF majors.
The purpose of this 3-hour internship for non-RTF majors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester.

RTF 330L (the version of this internship offered for majors) and RTF 330N may not both be counted. Offered on a pass/fail basis only.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the internship coordinator.

RTF 331P         DIGITAL PLATFORMS AND CULTURES (aka, DIGITAL MEDIA PLATFORMS) Web-BasedTBA

Open to BOTH RTF Majors & Non-RTF Majors. This course counts towards the Media & Entertainment Industries minor.
In modern society, we live our lives on and through digital media platforms. Every day, we use them to contact friends, share memes, watch television, stream music, review restaurants, buy products, find dates, and even access classes. We post and reblog, like and scroll, comment and subscribe, performing the endless creative labor of social media and further blurring the line between work and play. These digital platforms are microcosms of the contemporary media industries and, through them, we can critically examine the affordances, communities, politics, and economics that drive digital media. From Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram to YouTube, Twitch, and Spotify, this course will use social networking and streaming platforms to explore digital technologies, user modifications, participatory cultures, content policies, community guidelines, intellectual property, online piracy, user-generated content, creator compensation, data collection, audience surveillance, media promotion, influencer marketing, and more. By digging deeper into these platforms—their uses and users, celebrities and subcultures, affordances and algorithms—we can interrogate abstract concepts like power and control, agency and collectivity, censorship and surveillance. Anchoring such discussions in platforms, this course will explore what it really means for us to create, share, consume, and ultimately become media commodities in an increasingly digital world.

RTF 344M        INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAME DEVELOPMENT DEEPAK CHETTY

This course provides students with the fundamentals of interactive media through digital game creation. The course focuses on two areas: (1) general principals of game design and game development, and (2) development of simple 3D games. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M/388P  POST-PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES (COLOR GRADING) One section will be held in person, and one will be  Web-Based SIMON QUIROZ

This class will examine best practices in the finishing and mastering stages of digital post-production for a film or media piece focusing primarily on picture control and quality. The class will reinforce strong habits in media preparation when it comes to editing -- but this is not an editing class. We will depart from the moment the offline edit is done and move forward with preparing assets for online editing, sending them to sound design and mix, integration of VFX to color correction and grading (finishing) and then integration of all these elements (mastering) for deliverables creation. While we will cover color correction and grading, this course will also emphasize the technical elements that allow us to deliver the best quality images possible for different platforms. The concepts of infrastructure, pipeline and workflow should become second nature to the student upon successful completion of this course. Ideally, students should come with a pretty good understanding of nonlinear editing software. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.