2018 - Fall

Undergraduate Courses – Fall 2018

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

NON MAJOR COURSES
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

UTLA - WOFFORD DENIUS UTLA CENTER FOR ENTERTAINMENT & MEDIA STUDIES (listed on separate site)
INTERNSHIPS

NON-MAJOR COURSES

RTF 301 DIGITAL MEDIA CULTURES: HASHTAGS, MEMES AND MORE • MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA

Are you on Facebook? Do you use Snapchat, Instagram or YouTube? Do you Tweet? Whether you are a social media pro or only minimally active on these networking platforms, it is hard to deny that we live in a digital world and that our media culture is increasingly shaped by digital technologies, online spaces, streaming platforms, mobile devices and social media apps.

This course is designed as an introduction to digital media cultures. Students will develop an understanding of the role, history, scope and significance of digital media culture in the 21st century. The topics discussed in this course include digital identity, virtual avatars, memes and filters, online communities, social networks, streaming media, hashtag activism, interactive gaming and cybersecurity. Some of the questions we will engage include: How are we as a society changing the way we create, communicate and share as a result of digital media, streaming platforms or social media apps? How is our sense of self, identity and community transformed as we increasingly live, work, play and engage with each other online?

This course is designed for lower-division non-RTF majors who have not taken any previous coursework in film or media studies. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 301N        EXPLORING CHILDREN’S MEDIA • TBA

This course investigates current debates about media use by children within larger historical, social and cultural contexts. We examine the way that media produced for and about children have been used for play, learning, and socialization. Using examples from a diverse archive of children’s books, film, television, and digital media, we analyze the tensions between adults’ visions of childhood and the authentic uses of media by children. We also study the production of new media by children as they explore their own interests and identities. In the process, we focus on recurrent efforts by adults to regulate media and play for children. Using project-based work, we explore innovative ideas for the production of new media products for children and their families. This course is intended for anyone with a general interest in childhood studies, early childhood, education studies and child psychology.  Although media is central to the course, it does not require prior experience in media studies. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 303C         INTRO TO MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRIES – WEB-BASED & IN PERSONWENHONG CHEN

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a social science understanding of media industries and entrepreneurship. We start with a survey of key social science theories and concepts the media landscape. We examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile media and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media organizations and professionals. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. It is designed to help students achieve the following goals upon successful course completion:

  • Understand key social science theories, concepts and methods on the complicated interaction between media and society.
  • Recognize various opportunities, challenges, and responses media industries have to address due to globalization and technological advancements.
  • Understand government policies and industry practices that affect the formation and function of media organizations.
  • Understand the trajectory and development of various legacy and new media industry sectors.
  • Evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, challenges, and process in the media industries facilitated and constrained by institution and culture.

OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS. Fulfills the social & behavioral sciences core curriculum requirement for the 2018–2019 academic year.

RTF 306 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD CINEMA HISTORY – WEB-BASED & IN PERSONCAROLINE FRICK

Love the movies? Join us and explore how the movies developed from a circus amusement to multinational industry as well as how film can be understood as socio-cultural, technological, aesthetic and economic artifact. Global in scope, this course will sample a variety of “national cinemas” in order to compare and contrast how moviemaking developed uniquely in different parts of the world. We will also address how decades of popular and critical attention to the glamour and gossip surrounding Hollywood movies has affected our understanding of “American” cinema. The course fulfills VAPA requirements, and is designed for non-RTF majors who have not taken previous coursework in film or media studies. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION-WEB-BASED BEN BAYS

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? OPEN TO BOTH RTF MAJORS & NON-RTF MAJORS.

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LOWER DIVISION COURSES

RTF 307           MEDIA & SOCIETY • BRIANA BARNER, NABEEHA CHAUDHARY, RICHELLE CROTTY

This course surveys the role of media in our society through understanding economic, social, political, organizational, ideological, and global contexts. We will discuss themes relevant to media representation, audience interpretation, and social consequences.

RTF 308           DEVELOPMENT OF FILM & MEDIA • KATHY FULLER-SEELEY

This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF 317           NARRATIVE STRATEGIES & MEDIA DESIGN • BRITTA HANSON, CAMERON LINDSEY, BRETT SIEGEL, RAMNA WALLA

This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames.

RTF 318           INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE & SOUND • DEB LEWIS

This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project.


UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES

RTF 321C        HISTORY OF AMERICAN TELEVISION • TBA

This course surveys the history of American network television during the 20th century. We will explore the complex ways that technological, social, political, industrial, and cultural factors have interacted to shape the form and content of broadcast, cable, and satellite television. Our discussion of industrial practices and regulatory decisions will be balanced with an analysis of representational and formal-aesthetic practices. The semester will briefly conclude with a consideration of the meaning and implications of digital convergence on contemporary American – and global – media culture.

RTF 321D        FILM HISTORY TO 1960 • CHARLES RAMIREZ-BERG

This course is a survey of international film history for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of the history and aesthetics of the motion picture. On a weekly basis, it consists of two 75-minute lectures and a screening of a feature-length film. All RTF majors interested in learning more about the development of the motion picture are welcome, regardless of concentration. The course will cover the history of the medium from beginning (Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers) to 1960.  While the history of cinema will be looked at from various perspectives (as a technology, an industry, an entertainment medium, and a mode of personal and national expression), particular attention will be given to the evolution and development of film’s formal elements. Several written assignments are designed to acquaint students with how research in film history is conducted; in addition, three exams are also required.

RTF 323C         SCREENING RACE • JENNIFER McCLEAREN

This course is designed to provide students with the language and critical tools to understand and discuss racial and ethnic representation and production issues in U.S. film and entertainment television. We will survey the history and evolving representations of race and ethnicity in the entertainment media and related topics of concern to media producers, audiences, and scholars. While a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches will be reviewed, critical and cultural studies approaches to film and television criticism will be emphasized. This course carries UT’s Cultural Diversity flag and meets the Moody College of Communication’s Communication and Culture requirement. It focuses on the representation of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives in narrative film and television, as well as on Middle Eastern/Arab, Jewish, and European American representation and the construction of “whiteness.”  In addition, intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, and citizenship with race and ethnicity in mediated representation will be explored.

RTF 324C         INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL MEDIA • JOE STRAUBHAAR

This course critically examines the role that film, television, video games, and digital media play in shaping our sense of global, regional, national, and local cultures. It focuses on the role of global media institutions in society, from Hollywood and Netflix, to Bollywood, Korean Wave and telenovelas, and also examines how diverse audiences use global media to negotiate with issues of cultural identity in everyday life. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a broad range of issues and debates in the field of global media studies.

RTF 326C         TECHNOLOGICAL CULTURE • SHARON STROVER

This course asks big questions about the relationship between technology and culture, including how technology influences and is influenced by social factors and forces, and how US culture has framed technology through ideas about progress, convenience, determinism and control.  The course will examine the design, development and use of several communication technologies through a technology studies framework, and consider contemporary problems and conflicts at the intersection of technology and culture.

RTF 335           RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN AMERICAN TELEVISION • MARY BELTRAN

Television is one of the primary forums through which American notions of race, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship have been constructed; this course explores the evolution of these dynamics since the birth of U.S. commercial television in the late 1940s through the present day. We’ll explore how racial and ethnic diversity, and also gender, sexuality, and class have been represented in entertainment television and how various groups have participated in television production, consumption, and activism targeting networks and producers, as well contemporary debates and negotiations related to these issues. The history of television studies and a variety of humanistic approaches to television criticism also will be surveyed throughout the semester.

RTF 342           INDIAN CINEMA • SHANTI KUMAR

This course will provide a general overview of Indian cinema. We will critically examine some of the main genres and themes represented in a variety of commercial Hindi films -- popularly known as "Bollywood". We will analyze how Bollywood films represent issues of gender, class, caste, race, national identity, transnational mobility, and cultural traditions in India and in the Indian diaspora. We will also examine the ways in which the "Bollywood" film industry has evolved in relation to the political, economic, and cultural changes taking place at the global, national and regional levels of Indian society. Background in Hindi language or Indian cinema is not necessary to take this course. All films screened in this course will have English subtitles.

RTF 345           SOCIAL DOCUMENTARY • KAREN KOCHER

This course offers a conceptual overview of the forms, strategies, structures and conventions of documentary film and video. The course focuses on social documentary, or documentary that aims to construct arguments about the social world. Students will examine and discuss dominant and experimental modes of representation, important documentary movements and filmmakers, and a number of documentary genres. The aims of this course are two-fold. Students will gain knowledge of the current theoretical debates and dilemmas in documentary filmmaking, including questions of how to define documentary, what constitutes the ethical treatment of subjects and subject matter, and documentary's construction and positioning of its audience. In addition, students will develop critical thinking and viewing skills that will help them to conceptualize their own representations of the social world through audio-visual media.

RTF 347P         BUSINESS OF HOLLYWOOD • ALISA PERREN

What is going on in the media industries today? What kinds of issues and challenges are entertainment industry professionals dealing with? This class has two key goals: First, students will learn how the media industries operate, gaining a sense of the “big picture” of the contemporary film, television, and digital video landscape. Large-scale issues being faced by those working in the entertainment industry – including the impact of conglomerate ownership, regulation, globalization, and digitization on creative practices and work roles – will be addressed through readings and class discussion. Second, students will hear from a range of guest speakers coming from Hollywood, New York, and Texas about their personal experiences navigating the media business, past and present. While some of those visiting the class will work in production and postproduction (writing, directing, editing, etc.), most of the guests will work in other types of creative, managerial, and executive roles (e.g., studio and network development, acquisitions, marketing, talent management, etc.).

RTF 359           ASIAN AMERICAN MEDIA CULTURES • MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA

This course will examine diverse representations of Asian Americans in the US media by focusing on popular film, television, videogames and the World Wide Web. It will critically interrogate stereotypical images of Asian American identities, culture, and politics as well as representations that challenge and contest such stereotypes. In doing so, the course will locate the politics of representing Asian Americans in the US media within a broader historical, political and cultural context that includes issues of immigration, nationalism and citizenship, race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality and transnationalism.

RTF 359           RACE & DIGITAL MEDIA CULTURES • S. CRAIG WATKINS

This course considers the complex ways in which race continues to evolve and matter in the contemporary world.  While race certainly continues to matter how we think about race in the era of digital media grows more complex.  This course will consider four distinct areas and what they reveal about race, social change, and social and economic inequality.  Part One takes a look at the evolution of the digital divide, with a particular focus on how shifts in the adoption of technology—computers, the Internet, and mobile—are remapping participation in digital life.  Part Two explores the fascinating shifts that are happening in the realm of media and cultural representation with a specific emphasis on the user-generated content produced via social media channels.  Specifically, the course probes how YouTube has evolved to become a site for the production of counter-narratives that expand our notions of race.  Part Three considers some of the current and critical debates about racial and economic inequality in the innovation economy.  Digital media culture significantly shapes our knowledge economy and has serious implications for how we think about issues of diversity and inclusion in that economy.  The final section of the course, Part Four, explores the terrain of civic and political life.  In this section we consider recent data trends as well as prominent social media-driven political initiatives that compel a reconsideration of the future of racial politics in the age of digital media culture.

The primary course assignment is a collaborative effort that will culminate in a final research report that the students and instructor will produce examining many of the key themes addressed during the semester. 

RTF 359S         DOCUMENTING DIFFERENCE • CURRAN NAULT

This course will explore the theory, history, practice and poetics of minority documentary. With a particular emphasis on Asian American examples, students will engage documentary as a vital practice of minority activism and self-representation/preservation. Students will be introduced to influential documentaries across a wide range of styles and modes (poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive, performative), and will explore critical topics in documentary production and reception: fictions of realism, authenticity and objectivity; propaganda and persuasion; histories of ethnography and orientalism; questions of documentary ethics; narrative/formal strategies of activist resistance; autobiographical documentaries and the politics of self-representation; mockumentaries and the undoing of truth. Class assignments will combine written and creative work, and students will have the opportunity to create their own short documentary or documentary prospectus for their final project.

RTF 359S         GENDER & FAN CULTURE • SUZANNE SCOTT

Over the past decade, fans have been transformed from a stigmatized subculture into a mainstream power demographic, catered to and courted by media industries. This course will survey fan studies from the 1990s to the present, with an emphasis on fandom within convergence culture and digital fan cultures and practices, from fan fiction to fantasy football. Using gender as a critical axis, this course will consider the lingering impact of fan studies’ roots in feminist and queer media studies, and contemplate how gender shapes our discussions of fan labor, fan representations, fannish taste, modes of fan performance and production, and industry-audience power dynamics. Finally, this course will consider what forms of identity work have been elided or marginalized as a result of the field’s focus on gender as its central critical axis, in an effort to move towards a more intersectional conception of fan identity and fan studies. In addition to critically analyzing fans' transformative works, students will mobilize course concepts to produce and theorize fan texts of their own.

RTF 365D        CHILDREN, YOUTH, AND MEDIA • TBA

In this course, students take an historical look at the uses of media and popular culture by children and teens. Particular focus is placed on recent trends in the uses of digital tools, cultural products, information and media produced by children and youth.  An archive of media produced for children will be explored.  The course also examines the way that media effects research has been used as a basis for policy, regulation and social movements that seek to both expand and restrict young people’s uses of media over time.  Throughout the course, students will be asked to analyze, evaluate and creatively design media products intended for audiences of children and teens.

RTF 365D        GENDER, RACE, AND SEXUALITY IN SPORTS MEDIA • JENNIFER McCLEAREN

This course examines the cultural politics of sports with a focus on the representation of gender, race, and sexuality across an array of digital and legacy sports media. We will draw upon critical, cultural, and feminist theoretical lenses to consider sports as more than “just a game” or mere escapist entertainment. Rather, sports media culture can be understood as a microcosm of broader cultural, political, economic, and social forces where power struggles play out on the court, on the field, in the ring, and across multiple screens. This course investigates how discourses of gender, race, and sexuality shape who watches, who participates in, and who is represented in the multi-billion-dollar enterprise of mediated sports. We will specifically scrutinize how discourses socially construct the sporting body to reinforce social inequalities and how fissures of resistance continue to erode these constructions.

RTF 377H/387C  GLOBAL SPORTS MEDIA • JENNIFER McCLEAREN

**ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR**
Sports adopt numerous forms around the globe that tell vivid stories about the locations and cultures from which they come. Our myths, ideologies, and narratives embed themselves in sports media, which become windows into broader issues such as nationalism, international relations, immigration, human rights, and a plethora of other matters. This course examines sports media as a cultural, political, and economic phenomenon that are simultaneously nationalizing and globalizing forces. We interrogate the ways in which sports function as sites of contestation on local, regional, national, and international scales. The course will study sports media from a cultural studies perspective, which considers how power struggles operate through sports and who is advantaged and disadvantaged in this process. Topics may include colonialism, diasporas, regional and global fandoms, sports and development, racialized bodies and exploitation, human rights violations and sports mega-events like the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup, American exceptionalism, and human trafficking.

This course will be structured in a seminar format similar to graduate-level or honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course. Class is capped at 18 students.

RTF 377H/389   MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE • SHANTI KUMAR

**ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR**
Drawing on the current debates in media and cultural theory, this course provides in-depth analyses of a wide range of issues in media and popular culture-- such the changing nature of production and consumption in digital culture, representations of race, gender, class in the media, and the growing centrality of regulations and surveillance in everyday life. The goal of this course is to help students develop the theoretical and methodological skills necessary to critically evaluate the reciprocal relationship between media and popular culture in the 21st century. This course will be structured in a seminar format similar to graduate-level or honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course. Class is capped at 18 students. This course is structured in a seminar format similar to honors courses. Advanced undergraduate students interested in learning more about graduate school, or graduate students seeking a more introductory approach to advanced theoretical materials are especially encouraged to enroll in the course.



UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION-WEB-BASED BEN BAYS

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? OPEN TO BOTH RTF MAJORS & NON-RTF MAJORS.

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RTF 333        INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITINGCINDY McCREERY

RTF 333 will introduce you to screenwriting, and the primary forms which writing for the screen may take: features, shorts, television and documentary. We will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. In lecture and sections, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft.

RTF 337           EARS ONLY: AUDIO STORYTELLING • ANDREW GARRISON

Audio production and post for storytelling using voice, actuality, music, ambiences and sound effects. Structuring stories for audio only, plus microphone and recorder techniques, mono, stereo, and binaural recording,  field mixers, basic Pro Tools, signal processing, and noise reduction, applicable to sound for picture as well. Students will make a variety of small projects leading up to a longer, final project of their choice. 

RTF 340           MULTI-CAM TELEVISION DIRECTING • DAVID SCHNEIDER

This course will examine the techniques of multi-camera live television directing in numerous formats. It will provide an overview of the current technology and how that technology impacts directing decisions. Students will learn how directing styles shape various genres of broadcasts and how the director contributes to a successful production. The course will focus on planning and preparation and elements of production design. The demands of a controlled studio atmosphere will be compared and contrasted with those of live remote sports and entertainment programs. Exercises will acquaint the students with camera placement, shot blocking and shot selection.

RTF 341           AUDIO PRODUCTION INTO POST • ANDREW GARRISON

RTF 343           ADVANCED NARRATIVE • HUAY-BING LAW, YA’KE SMITH

From script to sound design, students spend the semester completing an advanced video production (3 - 10 minutes). Emphasis is placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Students are not required to direct, but must participate in the key crew positions on various projects for full credit.

RTF 343D        CINEMATOGRAPHY • JOHN FIEGE, JIM HICKCOX

This course explores visual storytelling and the art of cinematography through practice in a workshop environment. We will explore visual expression through a variety of cinema tools including camera and lighting as well as time, movement and color. Students are encouraged to think cinematically in both fiction and non-fiction approaches. A number of readings and exercises are assigned to also increase a student's technical knowledge and understanding of one's tools, leading to greater creative and personal visual expression.

RTF 344M       CG FOR FILM AND GAMES • BEN BAYS

This course is a production-based overview of Maya, with a focus on modeling, surfacing, lighting, and particles. Topics include interactive environments and CG compositing and lighting. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M       INTRO TO 3D ANIMATION • BEN BAYS

This course in 3D Animation is designed for students who seek an understanding of character performance within the context of animation. It provides comprehensive artistic and technical training to help each student develop as an animation artist within the computer-generated (CG) environment. Using Maya the student will create simple character rigs as an overview to understand rig mechanics, learn basic animation principles, and become familiar with the variety of animation tools found in Maya. These same animation techniques covered in class are foundation skills used in both in game and movie creation. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAME DEVELOPMENT • DEEPAK CHETTY

This course provides students with the fundamentals of interactive media through digital game creation. The course focuses on two areas: (1) general principals of game design and game development, and (2) development of simple 3D games. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        POST PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES • SIMON QUIROZ

This course examines the necessary processes and best practices to finish and deliver a film or a media piece after the offline edit is done. From preparing assets for online editing and sending them to sound design, integration of VFX to color correction, grading and mastering. While we will cover a great deal of color grading, this course will also emphasize on the technical elements that allow us to deliver the best quality of images possible for different platforms with the assets given from production and preparation from editing. Ideally, the students should come with a pretty good understanding of nonlinear editing software. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        WRITING/NARRATIVE DESIGN FOR VIDEO GAMES • SUSAN O'CONNOR

Interactive storytelling is a form of dramatic writing, just like theater or television. What makes the medium unique is that the author does not control the story; the audience does. Creatives have only just begun to explore the storytelling possibilities of this field. In this class, you will begin to develop the skills & knowledge necessary to write for interactive mediums such as video games, digital media, VR, and augmented reality. Your final deliverable in this course - a narrative design document - will serve as a writing sample for your portfolio. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344N        IMMERSIVE FILMMAKING • SIMON QUIROZ

By relying on stereoscopic 3D production and post-production techniques as our foundation, the goal of this course is to explore different ways and techniques of what makes immersive filmmaking as it applies to 360 spherical video and/or Stereoscopic 3D. Students will complete at least one short piece to be viewed via a Head Mounted Display, a 3D monitor, or on the web.

RTF 344N        ADVANCED VFX/MOTION GRAPHICS • DEEPAK CHETTY

Students organize, research and create projects based on advanced compositing and visual effects techniques. Topics include Particles and Simulations, 3D animation, and Digital Matte painting. Students must have taken RTF 344M -Visual Effects or RTF 344M - Comp. Animation and 3-D Modeling in order to take RTF 344M - Advanced Visual Effects.

RTF 344N        MOTION CAPTURE STUDIO • DEEPAK CHETTY 

Utilizing a combination of hardware (motion capture suits and facial capture techniques) and software (Unreal Engine, Motion Builder), students will write, direct and virtually shoot and edit a completely computer-generated film within Unreal Engine using an actual human performance. The course will also cover the history of motion capture techniques and their utilization within the world of cinema, gaming and non-entertainment related fields.

RTF 344T         GAME DEVELOPMENT CAPSTONE: 2D GAMES • PAUL TOPRAC

The Capstone Game Development course brings together students from Computer Science, College of Fine Arts, and Radio-TV-Film to form small teams in which each student will contribute specialized knowledge to the group creation of 2D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 2D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios. 
*If interested, please read instructions to apply. Consent of instructor required.

RTF 346           INTRO TO EDITING • DON HOWARD, KAREN KOCHER

Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

RTF 347E         ADVANCED EDITING • ANNE LEWIS

This course is a further elaboration of the principles and techniques of editing students will have encountered in RTF 346, building a broader technical background for professional development. We will discuss aesthetic, technical, and practical approaches to editing and consider how they might best apply to some (provided) editing challenges. In particular, we'll concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a range of material and creative solutions to editing challenges. Taught using AVID software.

RTF 351C        INTRODUCTION TO 2D ANIMATION • LANCE MYERS

This course will introduce the student to the art and mechanics of two-dimensional animation in film and in digital media. Weekly exercises will be required, with an emphasis on animation as personal expression. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 366K        CREATING A WEB SERIES • MIKE AKEL

This is a hands-on production course designed to create an original web series. Throughout the semester students will write, shoot and edit 3 episodes for season 1 of their show. The production teams will consist of three students and each person will get to direct at least one episode. The class will conclude with a professional feedback screening from Austin’s own ROOSTER TEETH producers!

RTF 366K        DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION • NANCY SCHIESARI

This class introduces students to single-camera field documentary video production. Basic instruction will be provided on digital cameras and digital off-line editing. Individual exercises and group projects will be assigned throughout the semester.

RTF 366K        MUSIC FILM PRODUCTION • MIRA LIPPOLD-JOHNSON

Students in this course will create music videos, short-form music documentaries and a live music/film performance. This is an intensive production course that will require ongoing creative work. Film students without music experience and music students without film experience are welcome in the class. We will work with original music, local musicians and/or creative commons copyright-free music to create innovative music videos. We will discover local subjects for music documentaries. We will screen and analyze music videos and films by directors who are also established feature directors, including Mark Romanek, Martin Scorcese, Ondi Timoner, Michael Apted and Michel Gondry featuring artists such as R.E.M., Laurie Anderson, Lady Gaga, Arcade Fire, Bjork, OK GO, Pearl Jam and others. We will have in-class visits from local music video and music documentary directors and producers including Bradley Beasley (Flaming Lips) and Karen Bernstein (Lou Reed, Ella Fitzgerald).

RTF 366K        NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • DEB LEWIS, NANCY SCHIESARI, STEVE MIMS

The class explores the expressive potential of sound and image through the production of digital video and 16mm exercises and short films. It is an intensive workshop in visual storytelling and non-dialogue filmmaking. It is designed to build upon the fundamental production concepts and techniques that were introduced in RTF 318 and to prepare students for the advanced narrative classes.

RTF 367D        DIRECTING WORKSHOP • YA’KE SMITH, BRIAN SCHWARZ

This workshop explores the role of the director in the process of translation from page to screen, focusing on the director/actor relationship, narrative structure and visual language. Assignments will include the casting, mounting and realization of dramatic narrative scenes. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the skills necessary to communicate effectively with actors to achieve authentic and vivid performances.

RTF 367K        PRODUCING FILM AND TELEVISION • MIICAH BARBER

RTF 367K will detail how things work in the supposedly noncreative side of the entertainment industry. The course will focus on the function and duties of a producer as he or she shepherds an idea through a project "life cycle": development, financing, pre-production, post-production, marketing and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers.

RTF 367Q        ADVANCED PRODUCING: SCRIPT TO SCREEN • SCOTT RICE

Script to Screen takes students behind the scenes of Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey’s latest film. By studying script drafts, shot lists, storyboards, early edits and even exclusive behind the scenes footage, students will garner insight into the making of a major Hollywood feature. Script to Screen also gives students practical instruction on producing their own projects including web series, shorts, commercials and indie features. From guidance on pitching to the ins and outs of founding a production company, Script to Screen is an essential “how-to” for students who are serious about producing and directing.

Prerequisites: Upper Division standing and either RTF 367K (Producing I), RTF 366D (Directing Workshop) or RTF 333 (Intro. to Screenwriting). Non-majors will not be allowed to add this course. If you do not meet the prerequisites you may seek admittance by contacting the instructor.

RTF 368C         ADVANCED DIRECTING • ANDREW SHEA

This course is designed to bring together advanced directing and acting students in an environment that will foster mutual growth and understanding of the director/actor dynamic in the filmmaking process. The class will work closely with Lucien Douglas's Acting For The Camera course in the Department of Theatre & Dance. Each student will direct or co-direct a Dogme-style film in which the Theatre & Dance actors play the leading roles. We will adhere to a production code that is a modified version of the Dogme 95 Vow of Cinematic Chastity. The goal will be to create collaborative, performance-based works that emphasize simplicity and ingenuity in image and sound choices.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: FEATURES • TOM WILLETT

In this class, students will complete a feature-length screenplay (90-120 pages) by the end of the semester. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: INDIES • TOM WILLETT

This workshop class is focused on writing screenplays designed for micro-budget, independent production. As students write their own feature-length scripts (90-120 pages) throughout the semester, they will study and analyze completed micro-budget films and their production methods. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work on a weekly basis. Incompletes will not be given in this class.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: SCI-FI/HORROR • BEAU THORNE

This workshop class will focus on horror and science fiction writing—two genres that have provided opportunities for countless new writers in the film industry. Each student will write a feature-length horror or science fiction screenplay and provide weekly notes on their classmates’ work. In addition, we’ll make a semester-long study of the current trends in each genre, reading and analyzing the biggest hits of recent years.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV PILOTS • STUART KELBAN

Each student will create a brand new television show (30 or 60 minute, network or cable) from the ground up: researching the setting and historical moment, inventing the characters and relationships, and ultimately designing the conflicts necessary to propel a show through multiple seasons. Students will then distill all of this work into a single showpiece episode - a pilot - that demonstrates the artistic and commercial potential of the new show. We’ll also be looking at a range of produced pilots (both aired and unaired) and discussing what makes the best of them work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV SPECS • FELICIA D. HENDERSON

This course explores writing for series television. Over the course of the semester, students will write "spec" scripts of an existing half hour comedy and hour-long drama. The class will take an in-depth look at TV writing from the inside out, learning how to "break" an episode and how a TV writer's room works.


INTERNSHIPS

RTF 330L INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:
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  • A weekly journal

  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship

  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

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RTF 178 RADIO-TV-FILM INTERNSHIP
RTF 178 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330L. The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their owfn internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:

  • A weekly journal
  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship
  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

Register Now