2019 - Fall

Undergraduate Courses – Fall 2019

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

NON MAJOR COURSES
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES
UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

UTLA - WOFFORD DENIUS UTLA CENTER FOR ENTERTAINMENT & MEDIA STUDIES (listed on separate site)
INTERNSHIPS

NON-MAJOR COURSES

RTF 301N ASIAN AMERICAN FILM HISTORY • CURRAN NAULT

This course will consider Asian American film from a historical perspective, from the pioneers of the silent era, to the YouTube stars of today. Students will explore Asian American films from a number of cinematic genres (romance, action, comedy) and forms (Hollywood, independent, documentary, experimental), as well as their attendant constraints and freedoms. Foundational to this course is the belief that film history can only be understood in relation to dominant social structures and the workings of the film industries and, as such, textual, reception and industrial analysis will all be employed. Key issues discussed will include: politics of representation in classic Hollywood cinema; the rise of Asian American independents; oppositional practices of Asian American spectatorship; intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality in Asian American films; exhibition and distribution strategies of Asian American film festivals; and transnational Asian (American) cinema. While this course will focus primarily on cinema, students will also have the opportunity to examine related forms of Asian American mediamaking, including the contemporary turn to web series and television shows like ABC’s Fresh Off the Boat. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 301N        SEX AND ROMANCE ON SCREEN BRITTA HANSON

Sexual attraction has been central to film narratives for as long as movies have existed. The same goes for television, and for new media, as well. All of these mediamakers must navigate the cultural restrictions and industrial regulations for what constitutes acceptable content in that time and place. This class will explore how human attraction is depicted in American media though a mix of practical, historical, and theoretical approaches. We will address such topics as interracial relationships, explicit sexual content, and the depiction of homosexuality, and social media content purges. We will employ theories of gender and sexuality to unpack why those standards changed, and cultural studies theories to explore those representations. Perhaps most crucially, we will look at the practical, on-set conditions through which this content is created. How can mediamakers foster ethical and comfortable working environments for actors performing romantic content? This class will include (school-appropriate) screenings, as well as writing responses, and the option of creative projects. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 303C         INTRO TO MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRIES – WEB-BASED & IN PERSONWENHONG CHEN

Drawing on literatures from media studies, management, sociology, and communication, this course helps students to develop a social science understanding of media industries and entrepreneurship. We start with a survey of key social science theories and concepts the media landscape. We examine the social, political, and economic contexts in which media are produced, distributed, and monetized. Special attention is paid to new media and communication technologies such as Web 2.0, social media, gaming, and mobile media and the implications of these disruptive innovations for media organizations and professionals. Cases in old and new media industries from different countries will be analyzed. It is designed to help students achieve the following goals upon successful course completion:

  • Understand key social science theories, concepts and methods on the complicated interaction between media and society.
  • Recognize various opportunities, challenges, and responses media industries have to address due to globalization and technological advancements.
  • Understand government policies and industry practices that affect the formation and function of media organizations.
  • Understand the trajectory and development of various legacy and new media industry sectors.
  • Evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities, challenges, and process in the media industries facilitated and constrained by institution and culture.

OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS. Fulfills the social & behavioral sciences core curriculum requirement for the 2018–2019 academic year.

RTF 306 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD CINEMA HISTORY – WEB-BASED & IN PERSONCAROLINE FRICK

Love the movies? Join us and explore how the movies developed from a circus amusement to multinational industry as well as how film can be understood as socio-cultural, technological, aesthetic and economic artifact. Global in scope, this course will sample a variety of “national cinemas” in order to compare and contrast how moviemaking developed uniquely in different parts of the world. We will also address how decades of popular and critical attention to the glamour and gossip surrounding Hollywood movies has affected our understanding of “American” cinema. The course fulfills VAPA requirements, and is designed for non-RTF majors who have not taken previous coursework in film or media studies. OPEN ONLY TO NON-RTF MAJORS.

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION-WEB-BASED BEN BAYS

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? OPEN TO BOTH RTF MAJORS & NON-RTF MAJORS.

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LOWER DIVISION COURSES

RTF 307           MEDIA & SOCIETY • JENNIFER McCLEAREN

This course surveys the role of media in our society through understanding economic, social, political, organizational, ideological, and global contexts. We will discuss themes relevant to media representation, audience interpretation, and social consequences.

RTF 308           DEVELOPMENT OF FILM & MEDIA • KATHY CACACE; NATHAN ROSSI; MAGGIE STEINHAUER

This course examines the historical development of media industries—film, radio, television and digital. Through lecture, section discussions, readings and screenings, we will investigate historical contexts (cultural, industrial, technological) in which media have been produced and consumed in the US and globally.

RTF 317           NARRATIVE STRATEGIES & MEDIA DESIGN • SUZANNE SCOTT

This class focuses on the style, structure and storytelling strategies in a wide range of media forms, from narrative films and television series to documentaries and videogames.

RTF 318           INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE & SOUND • DEB LEWIS

This course is designed to introduce fundamental production concepts and techniques through lectures, projects, and lab experiences. The acquisition of technical skills will be a priority, as this course is a prerequisite to upper-division production classes. Emphasis also will be placed on developing a storyteller's point of view and the ability to create works characterized by simple yet effective visual, aural and narrative structures. Students will be required to attend hands-on lab sections and to complete one still photography project, one sound-designed still photo project and one sync sound digital video project.


UPPER DIVISION - MEDIA STUDIES COURSES

RTF 321C        HISTORY OF AMERICAN TELEVISION • ADRIEN SEBRO

This course serves as a cultural history and critique of U.S. television as a form of art, nation building, and as a constantly evolving technology. The course will examine the interrelationships between programming and genre, business practices, social trends and culture. Starting with television’s origins in radio, performance and film and continuing through the present decade, we will survey television as an aesthetic and cultural phenomenon. Assigned texts and screenings will outline major historical trends and shifts, and consider programming in terms of cultural issues (issues of gender, race, class, and sexuality), consumption patterns, (how people watch and engage with television), and industrial practices (industry policies, regulation, and strategies).

RTF 321D        FILM HISTORY TO 1960 • CHARLES RAMIREZ-BERG

This course is a survey of international film history for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of the history and aesthetics of the motion picture. On a weekly basis, it consists of two 75-minute lectures and a screening of a feature-length film. All RTF majors interested in learning more about the development of the motion picture are welcome, regardless of concentration. The course will cover the history of the medium from beginning (Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers) to 1960.  While the history of cinema will be looked at from various perspectives (as a technology, an industry, an entertainment medium, and a mode of personal and national expression), particular attention will be given to the evolution and development of film’s formal elements. Several written assignments are designed to acquaint students with how research in film history is conducted; in addition, three exams are also required.

RTF 323C         SCREENING RACE • MADHAVI MALLAPRAGADA

This course is designed to provide students with the language and critical tools to understand and discuss racial and ethnic representation and production issues in U.S. film and entertainment television. We will survey the history and evolving representations of race and ethnicity in the entertainment media and related topics of concern to media producers, audiences, and scholars. While a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches will be reviewed, critical and cultural studies approaches to film and television criticism will be emphasized. This course carries UT’s Cultural Diversity flag and meets the Moody College of Communication’s Communication and Culture requirement. It focuses on the representation of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives in narrative film and television, as well as on Middle Eastern/Arab, Jewish, and European American representation and the construction of “whiteness.”  In addition, intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, and citizenship with race and ethnicity in mediated representation will be explored.

RTF 324C         INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL MEDIA • JOE STRAUBHAAR

This course critically examines the role that film, television, video games, and digital media play in shaping our sense of global, regional, national, and local cultures. It focuses on the role of global media institutions in society, from Hollywood and Netflix, to Bollywood, Korean Wave and telenovelas, and also examines how diverse audiences use global media to negotiate with issues of cultural identity in everyday life. The goal of this course is to introduce students to a broad range of issues and debates in the field of global media studies.

RTF 331P         EXPLORING VIRTUAL WORLDS: VIDEO GAMES AND BEYOND • NICK BESTOR

To play a game is to engage with another world, one which either abstracts the real world or evokes an alternative reality. This course uses video games as a launching pad for a broader survey of the narrative and creative process of worldbuilding. According to Jesper Juul, “the emphasis on fictional worlds may be the strongest innovation of the video game”—creating a compelling setting to explore has long been a goal for many game designers. Students will read key texts on worldbuilding, examining theories of engagement and immersion in order to examine the technological, industrial, political, and social contexts of virtual worlds. Utilizing a diverse range of examples from analog games (tabletop role-playing games, board and card games) as well contemporary video games (digital open-world sandbox games, massively multiplayer online games, adventure games), this course will also examine emergent work around virtual and augmented realities. These vast storyworlds are where we spend much of our time—we should understand who builds them, who owns them, and who inhabits them.

RTF 345          CONTEMPORARY HORROR CINEMA • LALITHA GOPALAN

Don’t expect gore and guts!  Rather, our collective endeavor during the term turns towards viewing films that envision extraordinary events and everyday perturbations that persist to unsettle us; time-bending narratives that turn our dreams into nightmares.  The course acknowledges our continued fascination with scenarios that taunt and provoke us to explore the ethics of viewing of what is unbearable.  The queue of films includes works by both established auteurs and emerging directors from contemporary world cinemas.

RTF 345          EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA & THE ART OF DISRUPTION • KATHLEEN TYNER

This course explores experimental and avant-garde media with a particular focus on North American artists.   Through the intentional disruption of mainstream media aesthetics and conventions, experimental media artists confront, question, and recontextualize the traditional narratives and conventions of commercial media.  In the process, they create dynamic tensions between artists and audiences that transform the reception of both mainstream and innovative media content. The course examines a portfolio of experimental work across genre, including narrative and non-narrative film, title sequences, the use of media performance and gallery installations, public art, online interactive formats, and experimental video games. Through active viewing of experimental and non-narrative media, students gain familiarity with seminal avant-garde media artists within the contexts of artistic movements in the fine arts and popular culture.  The course includes opportunities for the production of simple, individual and collaborative projects that explore the uses of experimental form, aesthetics and content for creative disruption and social expression.

RTF 347P         BUSINESS OF HOLLYWOOD • ALISA PERREN

What is going on in the media industries today? What kinds of issues and challenges are entertainment industry professionals dealing with? This class has two key goals: First, students will learn how the media industries operate, gaining a sense of the “big picture” of the contemporary film, television, and digital video landscape. Large-scale issues being faced by those working in the entertainment industry – including the impact of conglomerate ownership, regulation, globalization, and digitization on creative practices and work roles – will be addressed through readings and class discussion. Second, students will hear from a range of guest speakers coming from Hollywood, New York, and Texas about their personal experiences navigating the media business, past and present. While some of those visiting the class will work in production and postproduction (writing, directing, editing, etc.), most of the guests will work in other types of creative, managerial, and executive roles (e.g., studio and network development, acquisitions, marketing, talent management, etc.).

RTF 352           MEDIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST • KARIN WILKINS

The objectives of this course are to encourage students to examine critically existing information about the "Middle East" in U.S. media, and to learn about the roles media play in the Middle East. The themes we will address include media and modernity; film, television, and news industries in national, transnational, and global contexts; and representation of the Middle East in US news and US popular culture.

RTF 359S        FILM AND SOCIAL CHANGE • ADRIEN SEBRO

Often viewed as a medium of “pure entertainment,” film has also had an essential relationship to evolving social conditions in the United States and the struggle for change. This course will focus those moments where cinema has commented upon, documented, and even arguably had a hand in producing social change. The course aims to acquaint students with the film movements, film authors, production conditions, and audience reception practices that have linked film to broader social movements. Given the time constraints, the course focuses on American cinema with occasional references to influential cinema movements across the globe to place this American discourse in global perspective.

RTF 359S         HISTORY OF BLACK SITCOM • ADRIEN SEBRO

For cultural critics to ignore television’s potential as a form of resistance is to misread levels of vernacular meaning inherent in many Black television texts. Often viewed as a medium of buffoonery or harsh stereotyping, situational comedies that focus on Black communities have in fact played a crucial role in political progress, activism, and evolving social conditions in the United States. With close attention to themes such as socioeconomics, gender, religion, and politics, Black sitcoms address American social injustices in ways that other sitcoms simply are unable to. This course will chronicle a history of American Black sitcoms that have radically transformed television as a space for pedagogy and narratives of Black agency and resilience. Students will watch, read, and discuss popular themes and trends in Black sitcoms from the 1950s through the present.

RTF 359S         LATINA FEMINISMS & MEDIA • MARY BELTRAN

This upper-division undergraduate course surveys Chicana and Latina feminist scholarship, activism, and creative expression, with an emphasis on Latina media production and representation in U.S. entertainment media.  We will explore the rise and development of Latina activism and feminisms in relation to the Chicana/o, Puerto Rican, and U.S. women’s movements and in relation to historical and social contexts for women and girls of Mexican American and other U.S. Latina heritage.  The last half of the course will survey scholarship on Latina participation and representation in mediated popular culture and strategies of resistance enacted through Latina film and media production..

RTF 359S         QUEER MEDIA STUDIES • CURRAN NAULT

This course immerses students in the critical and theoretical analysis of queer media in order to explore dominant strategies used by the media industries, as well as those utilized by LGBTQI independents and subcultures. Important to this project are historical shifts in representation, including the mainstreaming of queerness, and the alternative media reception, production and exhibition practices developed by LGBTQI communities. Marginalized queer identities (including qpoc and transgender) will be centralized and the intersections of queer identities, queer politics and media culture will be engaged.

RTF 365D        MEDIA LITERACY & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT • KATHLEEN TYNER

Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and produce communication in a variety of forms. This course explores the expanding nature of literacy in a digital world with particular focus on its role in social and political contexts. Through the use of new media tools and an awareness of the historical uses of literacy for civic engagement and action, students will explore the way that media have been used to change society over time. Relationships between print, broadcast and digital media are explored to analyze the content and contexts of a wide variety of media messages. Students will design innovative presentations and projects that take advantage of new media tools and messages. Dialogue related to the ethical uses of media is central to the course.

RTF 370           COMEDY IN FILM & MEDIA • KATHY FULLER-SEELEY

This course explores theories of humor and comedy and applies them to media and performance from the early 20th century US to the present. Readings draw broadly from philosophy, cultural studies, cinema and TV studies, race, gender, sexuality, politics, psychology. We will examine producers, texts, performers and audiences across a wide variety of media -- television and film, literature, comics, radio, internet, live performance and other forms. The seminar will be focused on student group discussion and presentation of theories, texts, specific examples of applications, and findings. Students will develop research/and/or create projects.

RTF 370           ASIAN HORROR • LALITHA GOPALAN

This course assumes the student’s familiarity with classical horror films, European and American films to be precise, and all the attendant theories on genre and spectatorship.  While the established theoretical tracts have taken American and European films as their models, they seem totally unprepared for the vibrant horror films emerging from Asia, India to Japan, and this is exactly our charge for the course—to better understand the cinematic style of Asian horror films. As any cinephile would testify while these films have the stock figures of ghosts and monsters, haunted houses and possessed women, they also question our settled ideas of beauty and disgust that imperceptibly shape our notions of racial, sexual, and national differences. The course will consider how questions of national style and authorship revise the ways in which we consider genre cinema.

RTF 370           AMERICAN INDEPENDENT CINEMA • TOM SCHATZ

This course examines contemporary independent American cinema – that is, feature films produced and/or distributed within the U.S., outside the direct control of the major Hollywood studios, since the 1980s. This description is purposefully vague, and we will spend a good deal of our time refining and updating the terms independent and indie, which became increasingly complicated with the so-called indie film movement of the 1990s and the rise of Indiewood, dominated by conglomerate-owned indie divisions like Sony Classics and Fox Searchlight.

We will chart the key films, filmmakers and companies that propelled the indie movement, considering the industrial, aesthetic, economic, and socio-political factors involved, as well as the complex interplay between independent film and mainstream Hollywood. Our approach will be critical and analytical as well as historical, addressing issues of authorship and genre, narrative and cinematic style, representation and reception, and the cultural discourse generated by indie films and the movement itself.

This is a writing flag course that will require two 4-5 page critiques and a term paper, as well as a final essay exam. Readings will include John Pierson, Spike, Mike, Slackers and Dikes Revisited; Michael Z. Newman, Indie: An American Film Culture; Alisa Perren, Indie, Inc.: Miramax and the Transformation of Hollywood in the 1990s; and Geoff King, Indiewood, USA.



UPPER DIVISION - PRODUCTION & SCREENWRITING COURSES

RTF 329C         DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCTION-WEB-BASED BEN BAYS

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Painting and CGI are used to produce digital content for a variety of media including films, animation and interactive formats like video games and VR/AR.  This course is an interactive, online experience designed to teach you the foundational Digital Media Production tools: Photoshop, After Effects, Adobe Animate (Flash) and Maya. Through creative hands-on challenges, you will apply digital media tools and techniques to a variety of tasks in the pipeline of production from concept, storyboard, layout to compositor, VFX, CG and interactive design.  In the end, you must choose:  Will you become a generalist across all digital media production, will you specialize in one discipline or will you define a new role in digital media production? OPEN TO BOTH RTF MAJORS & NON-RTF MAJORS.

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RTF 333        INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITINGCINDY McCREERY

RTF 333 will introduce you to screenwriting, and the primary forms which writing for the screen may take: features, shorts, television and documentary. We will explore the basic theory and formal aspects of story, structure and character which are essential to all forms of screenwriting. In lecture and sections, we will carefully examine each step of the screenwriting process - from the initial premise, through character exploration and treatments, to writing the first draft - then apply those steps to the development of your own scripts. The class will also focus on critically examining produced scripts and films from a screenwriter's perspective, in order to learn more about the craft.

RTF 337 / 388P      EARS ONLY: AUDIO STORYTELLING • ANDREW GARRISON

Audio production and post for storytelling using voice, actuality, music, ambiences and sound effects. Structuring stories for audio only, plus microphone and recorder techniques, mono, stereo, and binaural recording,  field mixers, basic Pro Tools, signal processing, and noise reduction, applicable to sound for picture as well. Students will make a variety of small projects leading up to a longer, final project of their choice. 

RTF 340           MULTI-CAM TELEVISION DIRECTING • DAVID SCHNEIDER

This course will examine the techniques of multi-camera live television directing in numerous formats. It will provide an overview of the current technology and how that technology impacts directing decisions. Students will learn how directing styles shape various genres of broadcasts and how the director contributes to a successful production. The course will focus on planning and preparation and elements of production design. The demands of a controlled studio atmosphere will be compared and contrasted with those of live remote sports and entertainment programs. Exercises will acquaint the students with camera placement, shot blocking and shot selection.

RTF 341           AUDIO PRODUCTION INTO POST • ANDREW GARRISON

RTF 343           ADVANCED NARRATIVE • HUAY-BING LAW, YA’KE SMITH

From script to sound design, students spend the semester completing an advanced video production (3 - 10 minutes). Emphasis is placed on storytelling, strong cinematic style, and production values. Students are not required to direct, but must participate in the key crew positions on various projects for full credit.

RTF 343/388P ART DIRECTION FOR INDIE FILM • ADRIANA SERRANO

This class will explore the roles of an art director on low-budget films and the particular challenges posed by independent filmmaking including: supporting the creative vision of the production designer, budgeting, breakdowns, creating specific graphics, drafting, managing and hiring crew and clearances.  Students will collaborate as a class in the execution of the production design of a short narrative project.

RTF 343/388P PRODUCTION DESIGN • ADRIANA SERRANO

The primary concern of this class is the role of production design and how the creation and selection of sets, locations, and environments enhances and enriches this visual language.  Students will be instructed in the fundamentals of story, production, critical analysis, and collaborative processes. Students will be exposed to basic stagecraft techniques such as set construction, set decoration, props and will be required to design, draw, and dress a standing set. 

RTF 343C / 388P     ACTING FOR FILMMAKERS • ANDREW SHEA

This workshop explores the key elements of basic acting technique through active engagement in a variety of exercises and assignments: improvisation, monologue and scene study, observation, and emotional preparation.  The goal is to develop a deep understanding of the job of the actor: to live life truthfully under imaginary circumstances.

RTF 343D        CINEMATOGRAPHY • TBA

This course explores visual storytelling and the art of cinematography through practice in a workshop environment. We will explore visual expression through a variety of cinema tools including camera and lighting as well as time, movement and color. Students are encouraged to think cinematically in both fiction and non-fiction approaches. A number of readings and exercises are assigned to also increase a student's technical knowledge and understanding of one's tools, leading to greater creative and personal visual expression.

RTF 344M       CG FOR FILM AND GAMES • BEN BAYS

This course is a production-based overview of Maya, with a focus on modeling, surfacing, lighting, and particles. Topics include interactive environments and CG compositing and lighting. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M       INTRO TO 3D ANIMATION • BEN BAYS

This course in 3D Animation is designed for students who seek an understanding of character performance within the context of animation. It provides comprehensive artistic and technical training to help each student develop as an animation artist within the computer-generated (CG) environment. Using Maya the student will create simple character rigs as an overview to understand rig mechanics, learn basic animation principles, and become familiar with the variety of animation tools found in Maya. These same animation techniques covered in class are foundation skills used in both in game and movie creation. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAME DEVELOPMENT • DEEPAK CHETTY

This course provides students with the fundamentals of interactive media through digital game creation. The course focuses on two areas: (1) general principals of game design and game development, and (2) development of simple 3D games. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        POST PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES • SIMON QUIROZ

This course examines the necessary processes and best practices to finish and deliver a film or a media piece after the offline edit is done. From preparing assets for online editing and sending them to sound design, integration of VFX to color correction, grading and mastering. While we will cover a great deal of color grading, this course will also emphasize on the technical elements that allow us to deliver the best quality of images possible for different platforms with the assets given from production and preparation from editing. Ideally, the students should come with a pretty good understanding of nonlinear editing software. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344M        WRITING/NARRATIVE DESIGN FOR VIDEO GAMES • SUSAN O'CONNOR

Interactive storytelling is a form of dramatic writing, just like theater or television. What makes the medium unique is that the author does not control the story; the audience does. Creatives have only just begun to explore the storytelling possibilities of this field. In this class, you will begin to develop the skills & knowledge necessary to write for interactive mediums such as video games, digital media, VR, and augmented reality. Your final deliverable in this course - a narrative design document - will serve as a writing sample for your portfolio. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 344N        IMMERSIVE FILMMAKING • SIMON QUIROZ

By relying on stereoscopic 3D production and post-production techniques as our foundation, the goal of this course is to explore different ways and techniques of what makes immersive filmmaking as it applies to 360 spherical video and/or Stereoscopic 3D. Students will complete at least one short piece to be viewed via a Head Mounted Display, a 3D monitor, or on the web.

RTF 344N        ADVANCED VFX/MOTION GRAPHICS • DEEPAK CHETTY

Students organize, research and create projects based on advanced compositing and visual effects techniques. Topics include Particles and Simulations, 3D animation, and Digital Matte painting.

RTF 344N        MOTION CAPTURE STUDIO • DEEPAK CHETTY 

Utilizing a combination of hardware (motion capture suits and facial capture techniques) and software (Unreal Engine, Motion Builder), students will write, direct and virtually shoot and edit a completely computer-generated film within Unreal Engine using an actual human performance. The course will also cover the history of motion capture techniques and their utilization within the world of cinema, gaming and non-entertainment related fields.

RTF 344T         GAME DEVELOPMENT CAPSTONE: 2D GAMES • PAUL TOPRAC

The Capstone Game Development course brings together students from Computer Science, College of Fine Arts, and Radio-TV-Film to form small teams in which each student will contribute specialized knowledge to the group creation of 2D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 2D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios. 
*If interested, please read instructions to apply. Consent of instructor required.

RTF 346           INTRO TO EDITING • DON HOWARD, KAREN KOCHER, ANNE LEWIS, CHRIS ROLDAN

Whether you want to be an editor, director or producer, Introduction to Editing is an essential, hands-on course for any production student. By completing a series of narrative and nonfiction assignments, you will finish this course with increased confidence in, and understanding of, the seamless editing technique and the AVID software. We will also view and analyze film scenes to understand how editing contributes to meaning.

RTF 347E         ADVANCED EDITING • CHRIS ROLDAN

This course is a further elaboration of the principles and techniques of editing students will have encountered in RTF 346, building a broader technical background for professional development. We will discuss aesthetic, technical, and practical approaches to editing and consider how they might best apply to some (provided) editing challenges. In particular, we'll concentrate on the development of editing styles that are appropriate to a range of material and creative solutions to editing challenges. Taught using AVID software.

RTF 351C        INTRODUCTION TO 2D ANIMATION • LANCE MYERS

This course will introduce the student to the art and mechanics of two-dimensional animation in film and in digital media. Weekly exercises will be required, with an emphasis on animation as personal expression. A limited number of seats are open to non-majors.

RTF 366K        CREATING A WEB SERIES • MIKE AKEL

This is a hands-on production course designed to create an original web series. Throughout the semester students will write, shoot and edit 3 episodes for season 1 of their show. The production teams will consist of three students and each person will get to direct at least one episode. The class will conclude with a professional feedback screening from Austin’s own ROOSTER TEETH producers!

RTF 366K        DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION • SHELBY HADDEN

This class introduces students to single-camera field documentary video production. It will serve as both a workshop for creating short documentary films as well as a historical and conceptual analysis of what defines a documentary. We will screen a variety of documentary works, but our focus will be on low-budget independent films. There will be group discussions, reading assignments, lectures, hands-on lab instruction, and small production assignments. The primary focus of the class will be working through pre-production to post-production by starting with an idea and finishing with a short documentary film.

RTF 366K        MUSIC FILM PRODUCTION • PJ RAVAL

Students in this course will create music videos, short-form music documentaries and a live music/film performance. This is an intensive production course that will require ongoing creative work. Film students without music experience and music students without film experience are welcome in the class. We will work with original music, local musicians and/or creative commons copyright-free music to create innovative music videos. We will discover local subjects for music documentaries. We will screen and analyze music videos and films by directors who are also established feature directors, including Mark Romanek, Martin Scorcese, Ondi Timoner, Michael Apted and Michel Gondry featuring artists such as R.E.M., Laurie Anderson, Lady Gaga, Arcade Fire, Bjork, OK GO, Pearl Jam and others. We will have in-class visits from local music video and music documentary directors and producers including Bradley Beasley (Flaming Lips) and Karen Bernstein (Lou Reed, Ella Fitzgerald).

RTF 366K        NARRATIVE PRODUCTION • DEB LEWIS, HUAY-BING LAW, STEVE MIMS

The class explores the expressive potential of sound and image through the production of digital video and 16mm exercises and short films. It is an intensive workshop in visual storytelling and non-dialogue filmmaking. It is designed to build upon the fundamental production concepts and techniques that were introduced in RTF 318 and to prepare students for the advanced narrative classes.

RTF 367D        DIRECTING WORKSHOP • ANDREW SHEA, YA’KE SMITH

This workshop explores the role of the director in the process of translation from page to screen, focusing on the director/actor relationship, narrative structure and visual language. Assignments will include the casting, mounting and realization of dramatic narrative scenes. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the skills necessary to communicate effectively with actors to achieve authentic and vivid performances.

RTF 367K        PRODUCING FILM AND TELEVISION • MIICAH BARBER

RTF 367K will detail how things work in the supposedly noncreative side of the entertainment industry. The course will focus on the function and duties of a producer as he or she shepherds an idea through a project "life cycle": development, financing, pre-production, post-production, marketing and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students concurrently develop their own business plans/prospectuses for original film or television projects of their choosing. At the end of the semester, each student should have a complete and realistic business plan for a film or video project, one which is ready for presentation to entertainment industry contacts and financiers.

RTF 367Q        ADVANCED PRODUCING: SCRIPT TO SCREEN • SCOTT RICE

Script to Screen takes students behind the scenes of Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey’s latest film. By studying script drafts, shot lists, storyboards, early edits and even exclusive behind the scenes footage, students will garner insight into the making of a major Hollywood feature. Script to Screen also gives students practical instruction on producing their own projects including web series, shorts, commercials and indie features. From guidance on pitching to the ins and outs of founding a production company, Script to Screen is an essential “how-to” for students who are serious about producing and directing.

Prerequisites: Upper Division standing and either RTF 367K (Producing I), RTF 366D (Directing Workshop) or RTF 333 (Intro. to Screenwriting). Non-majors will not be allowed to add this course. If you do not meet the prerequisites you may seek admittance by contacting the instructor.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: FEATURES • TOM WILLETT

In this class, students will complete a feature-length screenplay (90-120 pages) by the end of the semester. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: INDIES • TOM WILLETT

This workshop class is focused on writing screenplays designed for micro-budget, independent production. As students write their own feature-length scripts (90-120 pages) throughout the semester, they will study and analyze completed micro-budget films and their production methods. In addition, they will read and comment on their classmates' work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: SCI-FI/HORROR • BEAU THORNE

This workshop class will focus on horror and science fiction writing—two genres that have provided opportunities for countless new writers in the film industry. Each student will write a feature-length horror or science fiction screenplay and provide weekly notes on their classmates’ work. In addition, we’ll make a semester-long study of the current trends in each genre, reading and analyzing the biggest hits of recent years.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV PILOTS • FELICIA D. HENDERSON

Each student will create a brand new television show (30 or 60 minute, network or cable) from the ground up: researching the setting and historical moment, inventing the characters and relationships, and ultimately designing the conflicts necessary to propel a show through multiple seasons. Students will then distill all of this work into a single showpiece episode - a pilot - that demonstrates the artistic and commercial potential of the new show. We’ll also be looking at a range of produced pilots (both aired and unaired) and discussing what makes the best of them work.

RTF 369           ADVANCED SCREENWRITING: TV SPECS • STUART KELBAN

This course explores writing for series television. Over the course of the semester, students will write "spec" scripts of an existing half hour comedy and hour-long drama. The class will take an in-depth look at TV writing from the inside out, learning how to "break" an episode and how a TV writer's room works.


INTERNSHIPS

RTF 330L INTERNSHIP IN FILM & ELECTRONIC MEDIA
The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their own internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:
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  • A weekly journal

  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship

  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

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RTF 178 RADIO-TV-FILM INTERNSHIP
RTF 178 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330L. The purpose of this course is to provide professional internship experiences with television and radio stations, film, video, and new media production companies, governmental agencies and production units, audio recording studios, and new media industries. Students are responsible for securing their owfn internship position. Resources and position listings are available in the College of Communication Career Services (CCS) office, CMA 3.104 / (512) 471-9421.

At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit an Internship Report consisting of:

  • A weekly journal
  • Work samples or a portfolio
  • Your evaluation of the internship
  • Your supervisor's confidential evaluation of your performance

Register Now