2022 - Summer

Online activities and exams may be scheduled; proctoring charges may apply. Go to http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/ for additional information and to test your computer and internet connectivity. For financial assistance with tech needs necessary to participate in these classes, please apply for funding through UT’s Student Emergency Services.

FOR CLASS DETAILS, INCLUDING TIMES, CLICK ON "FIND COURSES NOW" ON THE REGISTRAR'S PAGE.

Summer courses are offered in three terms. The letter preceding the course number describes the course dates:

f first term June 2 - July 7
s second term July 11 - August 12
n nine-week term June 2 - July 26
w whole session June 2 - August 12

NINE-WEEK TERM

UTLA - WOFFORD DENIUS UTLA CENTER FOR ENTERTAINMENT & MEDIA STUDIES (listed on separate site)


WHOLE SESSION

Learn more about RTF Internships

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RTF 130N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
 
RTF 130 is a one-hour internship course intended for students doing a second internship, i.e., those who have already taken RTF 330.The purpose of this course for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors. 
 
 
RTF 330N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
The purpose of this 3-hour internship for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors.

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RTF 336 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM    Hybrid / Blended

This course gives students the opportunity to do independent research or creative projects. These are developed and executed by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. (Note: Students cannot use departmental equipment to complete these projects.)

Prerequisites:

  • Upper-division standing
  • Approval from a faculty sponsor
  • Approval from the Department Chair
RTF 630N INTERNSHIP IN THE MEDIA INDUSTRIES
 
The purpose of this 6-hour internship for RTF majors and minors is to provide practical work experience in the media industries (film, television, radio, video games, and/or digital media). Students must make their own arrangements to secure relevant internships in the Austin area, though remote internships may be accepted, depending on need and opportunity. In addition to providing practical experience in the vocation of your choice, this course is designed to help you develop the resources and routines necessary to succeed in the contemporary media industries. While no set meeting time is listed, there will be multiple required meetings and/or workshops scheduled throughout the semester, totaling 10 contact hours for the semester. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis only and is restricted to RTF majors and minors.

FIRST TERM

RTF f328C     GENDER AND MEDIA CULTURE - Web-BasedJENNIFER McCLEAREN

Open to both RTF majors and non-majors.
This course provides an introduction to the critical and theoretical analysis of gender (femininities and masculinities) in media (film, television, new and emerging media). Students will engage dominant and oppositional practices of media production, representation, and reception to investigate the sociocultural mechanisms that shape individual and collective notions of gender in our media-saturated environment. Paying particular attention to wider questions of power, politics, and identity, students will read key texts in cultural, media, and communication studies, as well as influential theories within gender, feminist, and transgender studies. Although primarily focused on the mediated construction of gender, this course insists on an intersectional approach that examines gender in conjunction with race, class, sexuality, nation, and generation.

RTF f344M COMICS AND CARTOONS - Web-Based • BEN BAYS
Open to both RTF majors and non-majors.

Students trace the legacy of cartoons and modern sequential art through hands-on skills-building projects.  The painting traditions of the middle ages gave rise to the cartoon, a form of illustration which embraced non-realism, caricature and satire.  The form has evolved through the rise of mass media and technological advances to its modern animated form. From panels, gags, strips, pages, serials and animated shorts, students explore the history of cartoons by creating them.

RTF f344M VIDEO GAME PRODUCTION - Web-Based • BEN BAYS
Open to all majors.

Students explore the concepts and components of a contemporary video game as they create one.  Story, Audio, GUI, Modeling/Texturing, Animation, Camera, Lighting and Simulation intersect with Interactivity through hands-on skills-building exercises in a highly collaborative production pipeline. No coding required.
 

RTF f359S LATINA/OS AND U.S. MEDIA - Web-Based • Mary Beltrán

This course provides a critical survey of the participation and representation of Latina/os in U.S. English-language film and television since the silent film era.  It explores the representation of Mexican Americans and other Latina/os in North American media culture with respect to how various Hispanic origin groups have been portrayed and Hollywood and the television industry’s construction of notions of Latinidad.  Intersections with gender, race, citizenship, class, sexuality, and other elements of identity also will be highlighted.  We’ll also survey the work of U.S. Latina and Latino media producers and explore contemporary issues and debates related to Latina/o representation and shifting and static notions of Latinidad in the public imaginary.  This course carries the Cultural Diversity flag.

RTF f367K PRODUCING FILM & TELEVISION - Web-Based • Micah Barber

An overview of the business and creative side of the film and television industry.  This course focuses on the function and duties of a producer as they shepherd an idea through a project “life cycle”: development, financing, pre-production, production, post-production, marketing, and distribution. Lecture topics will mirror the project life cycle while students build a vocabulary that enables meaningful understanding of the film and television industry and its protocol. Using weekly lectures, course readings and workshops to reinforce each class discussion topic, students will, in groups, develop their own original film or scripted television series.

Prerequisite: For Radio-Television-Film majors, upper-division standing,Radio-Television-Film 317 and 318 with a grade of at least B- in each, and six additional hours of coursework in Radio-Television-Film; for others, upper-division standing. Carries writing and independent inquiry flag.


SECOND SESSION

RTF s352  GLOBAL CULT CINEMA - Web-Based • BABAK TABARRAEE

With their dedicated fans and enduring presence in the public sphere, cult films unfold important crossovers between media and culture in different regional contexts. This course will analyze global configurations of cult cinema, especially in the Middle East. From various scholarly viewpoints, we will ask how and why certain movies have generated emotional attachments in different sociocultural environments. Reviewing the foundational texts on the concept of cult in cinema studies, we will examine several approaches to studying the applications and functions of cult films and film cults. We will specifically examine case studies from and through the Middle East to understand the resonance of cult media texts around the world. Moreover, we will investigate the communal identities displayed through the cultural expressions of cult fans in order to better understand people’s complex relationship with the political order and cultural power. As such, “Global Cult Cinema” will explore less examined but significant areas of international film canons and fandoms. The interdisciplinary nature of this course further enables us to investigate important constituents of audience reactions to the global and local media through the purposeful use of the theories on popular culture, fandom, stardom, and politics of national and transnational film reception. This course carries the Global Cultures Flag (GC) and the Writing Flag (Wr).